Posted by: Sandy Steinman | April 27, 2018

Oregon Wildflowers 4/27/2018

Oregon Wildflowers  has just posted a new weekly summary

Bald Butte, Mount Hood National Forest (4/23)
Robin Howard Clark reports that the wildflowers have started blooming at Bald Butte. Varieties include Western spring beauty (Claytonia lanceolata), Great Hound`s Tongue (Cynoglossum grande), Fairyslipper (Calypso bulbosa), Red-flowering currant (Ribes sanguineum), Naked broomrape (Orobanche uniflora), Glacier Lily (Erythronium grandiflorum), Oaks Toothwort (Cardamine nuttallii var. nuttallii), and Paintbrush (Castilleja sp.). Please see her photos in the Facebook group.

Camassia Natural Area, West Linn (4/23 – 4/26)
Many group members have visited Camassia and posted wonderful photographs. Here are a few of them: Link 1  Link 2  Link 3 . If you are interested in visiting Camassia this season, you should try to visit as soon as possible.

Cape Horn, Columbia River Gorge (4/26)
Jeanne-Marie Duval Pierrelouis reports that wildflowers have begun to bloom at Cape Horn, including Poison Larkspur (Delphinium trolliifolium), Candyflower, Fringecup, Wild Ginger, Pacific bleeding hearts, and Snow Queen. I expect another week or two before peak, especially the larkspur. Please see her photos in the Facebook group.

Cathedral Hills County Park, Grants Pass (4/23 – 4/26)
Brandon Corder reports that many varieties are in bloom at Cathedral Hills Parkin Grants Pass, primarily along the `Outback` loop. Please see his photos in the Oregon Native Plants group.

Catherine Creek, Columbia River Gorge (4/26)
Everything is still going strong at this location, as evidenced by Karl Peterson’s photos in the Facebook group. Additionally, the bitterroot started to bloom last weekend with many more on the way.

Columbia Hills State Park / The Dalles Mountain Ranch, Columbia River Gorge (4/22-4/24)
Many group members have visited this location and posted wonderful photographs. Here are a few of them: Link 1  Link 2  Link 3 . If you are interested in seeing the balsamroot at its best, you should try to visit as soon as possible.

Dog Mountain, Columbia River Gorge (4/21 – 4/24)
Though it is still too early for the famous balsamroot carpets in the high meadows, Sandeep Koratagere and others report that the wildflowers have started blooming at Dog Mountain including: Small-Flowered Penstemon (Penstemon procerus); Western Buttercup (Ranunculus occidentalis); Paintbrush (Castilleja sp.); Western Trillium (Trillium ovatum); and others. Please see his photos in the Facebook group.

Eight Dollar Mountain, Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest (4/24)
Brandon Corder reports that many varieties are in bloom at Eight Dollar Mountain. Please see his photos in the Oregon Native Plants group.

Lacamas Park, Camas (4/24)
Keri Sprenger reports that many wildflowers are blooming at Lacamas Park, including Fawn Lilies, Chocolate Lilies, Camas Lilies, Sea Blush, Oregon Grape, Trillium, Thimbleberry, Kittentails, Woodland Strawberry, Bleeding Hearts, Fringecup, Saxifrage, Buttercup, Hooker`s Fairy Bells, Largeleaf Sandwort, Skunk Cabbage, Candyflower, Vanilla Leaf, Toothwort, and Blue-Eyed Mary. Please see her photos in the Facebook group.

Lower Table Rock, Medford (4/24)
Jennie Wike reports that many varieties are in bloom at this location. The meadows near the trailhead are pink with sea blush. The buckbrush shrubs and manzanita were in full bloom. Tolmie`s cats ears lilies, Henderson`s shooting stars, blue-eyed Mary, western buttercup, prairie star, forktooth ookow, Oregon bleeding hearts, red bells, wild celery, Menzie`s larkspur, and fiddleneck were also blooming along the trail to the top. At the top, the vernal pools are almost gone, leaving a wake of wildflowers. Woolly meadowfoam, goldfields, rusty popcorn, bicolored lupine, desert parsley, ookow, and fiddlenecks were blooming at the top. Lupine and goldfields are peak, while the meadowfoam is near peak. Please see her photos in the Facebook group.

Memaloose Hills, Columbia River Gorge (4/21 – 4/24)
Numerous group members (including me) visited this location during the past week. Photos: Link 1  Link 2  Link 3. Everything looks good, and if you are particularly interested in seeing the balsamroot on Chatfield Hill, you should try to visit as soon as possible.

Mitchell Point, Columbia River Gorge (4/26)
Carol Sweeney reports that a number of things are blooming including: Large-Flowered Blue-Eyed Mary, Woodland Stars, Larkspur, Pungent desert parsley, and Calypso orchids. Please see her photos in the Facebook group.

Mosier Plateau, Columbia River Gorge (4/21 and 4/26)
I visited last weekend. The wildflowers at Mosier Plateau look good now, and should improve during the next several weeks as the Northwest Balsamroot(Balsamorhiza deltoidea) reaches its peak. Flowers currently blooming include: Prairie Star (Lithophragma parviflorum), Fiddleneck (Amsinckia sp.), Pungent Desert Parsley (Lomatium grayi) especially on the slopes next to the creek, Slender Popcorn Flower (Plagiobothrys tenellus), Nuttall`s Larkspur (Delphinium nuttallianum), Nine-Leaf Desert Parsley (Lomatium triternatum), Western Buttercup (Ranunculus occidentalis), Small-Flowered Blue-Eyed Mary (Collinsia parviflora), Northwestern Saxifrage (Saxifraga integrifolia), Fringe Pod (Thysanocarpus curvipes), Miniature Lupine (Lupinus bicolor), Miner`s Lettuce (Claytonia perfoliata ssp. perfoliata), Big-Head Clover (Trifolium macrocephalum) at and Naked Broomrape (Orobanche uniflora) at higher elevations, and Bigroot (Marah oreganus). Carol Sweeney reports that a number of things are blooming including: Large-Flowered Blue-Eyed Mary, Woodland Stars, Larkspur, Pungent desert parsley, and Calypso orchids. Carol Sweeney visited on April 26th and posted more photos in the Facebook group.

Rowena Plateau, Columbia River Gorge (4/26)
Molly Sadler Espenel reports that Balsamroot, Lupine, Bicolored cluster lily, and Small-Flowered Prairie Star are blooming. Please see her photos in the Facebook group.

Sevenmile Hill, Columbia River Gorge (4/22)
Cheryl Willson reports that Balsamroot, Lupine, Bicolored cluster lily, Buttercup, and others are blooming at this location. If you are interested in visiting for the balsamroot, you should go within the coming week. Please see her photos in the Facebook group.


And now for a brief non-wildflower message from your group creator/curator…

Many of you already know about my musical persona through my annual piano benefit concerts for Friends of the Columbia Gorge. In addition to the piano, I have a new musical project which has been described as “the musical equivalent of political cartoons”. If you are interested in learning more, please send your email address to gregliefmusic at gmail dot com. Thank you for your attention.


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