Posted by: Sandy Steinman | March 28, 2017

Red Hill Road Wildflowers 3/28/17

Red Hill Road has excellent displays of wildflowers right now.

Most displays are primarily Goldfields mixed with Buck Brush shrubs. There is also a mix of Johnny Tuck, Tidy Tips and Star Lily in the displays closed to Chinese Camp.

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | March 28, 2017

Henry Coe Wildflower Update 3/28/17

13

Henry Coe State Park has a new wildflower bloom report  for March 28, 2017 at the Pine Ridge Association website with photos and a list of flowers now in bloom at: Henry W. Coe – Wildflower Guide.

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | March 28, 2017

Three California Wildflower Updates

Where to photograph in California – Yahoo Groups (Calphoto) has a new reports yesterday for New Cuyama, Wind Wolves and Jepson Prairie.

New Cuyama today (or there abouts).  Conditions were excellent! Not as good as 2010, but plenty of Hillside Daisies and Lupines close to the road.  A good mix of Tidy Tips, Cream Cups, Goldfields, Blue Dicks, mini Lupines (not sure of the official name), a scattering of Owls Clover and Poppies (if you looked real hard).
Definitely worth a drive:https://flic.kr/p/S6rZiv

Wind Wolves today.  There are some patches of color on the distant hillsides, but nothing much along the trails.  Wildflower trail was past peak.  Fiddlenecks are most predominate in the valley with scattering of Lupine.  Some Tansy leaf Phacelia (past peak) in the first mile of the Canyon View Trail and Blue Dicks further in.  I saw less than a dozen of poppies along the trail.  The grasses were tall and thick (and beautiful in the wind).  It was a great hike, but not for color.

Jepson Prairie If anyone is planning on heading out to Jepson Prairie this week or next, a recommendation. Flowers in the public area are looking good, but to see the most spectacular display you need to walk (or drive) down the road from the main parking lot as it crosses the lake, going to the end (it is about 1.2 miles) near the barn. The display of Meadowfoam mixed with Yellow Carpet is amazing right now. Keep in mind, though, that you can’t go into the field as that area isn’t open to the public. You have to stay on the road side of the barbwire fence. Also, if you want to get close to the fence, bring your boots as the water in the ditch is calf deep (look for Chorus Frog tadpoles there)…. the meadowfoam is as good as I’ve ever seen it. Also note that you want to be there more or less mid morning to midday, because Meadowfoam closes up at night and it takes time to open up. 

It can be windy (today was amazingly calm), so check conditions at the Travis AFB weather station.

Side note: A reminder that there are public tours now through Mother’s Day on Saturday/Sunday 10:00 am to noon. You will see more interesting things if you go on the public tour.

Consider signing up for Where to photograph in California – Yahoo Groups (Calphoto) to see more reports and discussions of nature and photography in California.

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | March 28, 2017

Massive whale formation gathers off Pt. Reyes – SFGate

The San Francisco Chronicle

More than 66 gray whales were spotted off Point Reyes on Saturday, the most so far this season.

See photos and read full story at Massive whale formation gathers off Pt. Reyes – SFGate

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | March 27, 2017

Table Mt. Wildflowers 3/27/17

North Table Mountain Wildflowers report
submitted by Daniel Jhong

There is now a good showing of wildflowers at the North Table Mountain Ecological Reserve in Oroville, CA. However, the flowers seem to be a bit late as compared to last year. Not as many poppies yet and many of the goldfields are small but growing. It might still be at least a week away from peak bloom. The most concentrated areas of flowers seem to be near the top of some of the small hills and surrounding the mounds of volcanic rock.
Because it rained the day before, several of my friends ended up with wet and muddy shoes. If you don’t have water resistant shoes, it may be good to have an extra pair to change to when you get back to your vehicle. If you are going to hike to the waterfalls, it may require crossing and rock hoping over a couple small streams/ creeks along the way. There are some paths but no real established trails. The CDFW is not offering guided wildflower tours this year but there is staff by the entrance on the weekends to answer questions and help with directions. If you watch or follow many of the locals, they are all going about the same direction toward Phantom Falls walking straight out into the fields and going a bit to the right from the parking lot entrance. After going about 1 -2 miles you will see a lot more purple flowers as you get near Phantom Falls.

The Oroville Wildflower & Nature Festival will be this coming Saturday, April 1st from 10am to 4pm at the Nelson Complex. There is free admission to the event and guided wildflower bus tours up to Table Mountain with a $10 reservation donation.

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | March 27, 2017

Sierra Foothills Backroad Flowers and Birds 3/27/17

Today we did a drive through the backroads of the Sierra Foothills west of highway 49. From Highway 49 we took the Old Toll Rd. to Hornitos to Lake McSwain and Lake McClure back to Hornitos to Bear Valley Rd. to Why. 49. We followed at least in part directions from Toni Faurver’s Wildflower Walks and Roads of the Sierra Gold Country in her Mariposa area section.

The first part of the road is described as hard chaparral. It has Chamise, Grey Pine, White-leaf Manzanita, Buck Brush Ceanothus, Live Oak and Toyon.  The later part of the road was Oak Woodland and Oak Savannah and ranches. There was a lot of song by Wrentits. We also saw Chipping Sparrows, Acorn Woodpeckers and Ravens.

There was also a stream running parallel to the road creating moisture for plants that needed it.  Flowers in bloom included Blue Dicks, Buttercups, Mtn. Violets, Goldfields, Johnny Tuck, Fringepod or Peppergrass, Popcorn, Fiddleneck, Caespitose  or Tufted Poppy, a small Lupine with narrow leaves, a somewhat taller Lupine, and Harvest Brodiaea.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

We drove past the outskirts of Hornitos on the way to the Lakes and found Hornitos Rd. less interesting as it was mostly ranch lands. We spotted crested Cormorant, Black Phoebe and Nuttall’s Woodpecker.

When we first went into the Lake McSwain area we were disappointed as we mainly saw only Johnny Tuck, Caterpillar Phacelia, Valley Tassels, an alien purple vetch, and lots of alien Filaree.

However, after we left the picnic areas and main part of the recreation area drove towards Lake McClure; it was a more interesting Oak Woodland. We saw white and blue lupines, Fiddleneck, Valley Tassels, Pretty Face, Harvest Brodiaea, Blue Dicks, Caespitose Poppy, Tomcat Clover and Bush Lupine.

We took Bear Valley Road back, which was somewhat like Old Toll Road, a combination of Oak Woodland, Ranch Lands, and Hard Chaparral. We saw a King-Fisher, Red-Tail Hawk, Western Scrub Jay, and Turkey Vultures.  Flowers included Chinese Houses, Fiesta Flower, Fiddlenecks, Woodland Star, Popcorn, Johnny Tuck, Goldfields, Buck-Brush, and Redbud.

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | March 27, 2017

Anza-Borrego Desert Wildflowers Update 3/27/17

Anza-Borrego Desert Natural History Association reports

The low elevation bloom in the Borrego Valley is well past its prime right now but scattered flowers can still be found in the areas where the bloom was heaviest over the past few weeks.  Coyote Canyon and the sunflower fields along Henderson Canyon Road still have some flowers but caterpillars and time are deteriorating them on a daily basis. There are still many scattered wildflowers along the trails in the vicinity of Borrego Springs, and this is a great time to hike, with the desert remaining much greener than it has been in years.   Glorieta Canyon, rising from the southwest side of the Borrego Valley is a great short hike, stunning right now and emerged in a bright yellow bloom of Brittlebush.  Yaqui Pass, at the south end of the Borrego valley, on S3, is also brilliant with its yellow display.  Beavertail cactus, with bright fuchsia colored flowers, are now in bloom in many locations around the Borrego Valley.   A good area to see flowers within a short walk of the car is the “ocotillo forest” south of Tilting T along Borrego Springs Road, with hundreds of ocotillo in full bloom and scatterings of desert dandelions covering the ground.

See photos at Anza-Borrego Desert Wildflowers Update

Anza-Borrego Desert Wildflowers has these recent Wildflower Reports

3/26 A loop completely off the beaten track, off the busy pictographs trail.
The boulder rich terrain and south facing terrain are ideal for a good bloom.
This was our third try to find Thymophylla pentachaeta var. belenidium in bloom, so we had a pretty good feeling for the terrain, so this time we

Read More…

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | March 27, 2017

Death Valley N.P. Wildflowers 3/27/17

Death Valley National Park Facebook page has the following wildflower update

“Are there flowers in Death Valley this year?”

Due to last year’s superbloom, this has been the most common question in the past few weeks. However, did you know, that a superbloom event only occurs once a decade?! One only occurs under near perfect conditions – the right amount of rain, sufficient warmth, and a lack of drying winds are all required. Unfortunately, this year has been a slow year for flowers.

However, there are still a handful of places where you may be lucky enough to see just a few species. Mud Canyon, Jubilee Pass, and the Furnace Creek Visitor Center courtyard are 3 of the places where you’ll have the best luck. Happy hunting!

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | March 27, 2017

Hungry Valley Wildflowers 3/26/17

Hungry Valley OHV has a new wildflower for 3/26/17

The grasslands are slow to show bright color yet, but the deep golden-hued fiddleneck and the pinkish filaree are in abundance.

Though just starting in the valley, the flowers are beginning to get showy with purple patches of phacelia found behind Sterling Campground and north of Circle Campground; 4WD recommended to access these sites, though they are visible from Gold Hill Road if you are northbound.

The goldfields have exploded in many areas of the park, but are especially eye-catching at the practice track. The white daisy-like tidy tips are blooming between Aliklik and Lane Ranch Campgrounds among the goldfields. Further south, the blue dicks are starting to open on their long, slender stems.

See photos at  Wildflowers at Hungry Valley

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | March 27, 2017

DesertUSA Wildflower Updates 3/27/17

Here are the links to DesertUSA’s current wildflower bloom reports and photos

Arizona Deserts

California Deserts

More Areas

Anza Borrego

Carrizo Plain National Monument

Antelope Valley California Poppy Reserve

MORE…

New eBook Wildflower field guide ebook, find flowers by color

Photos tips: Most digital point-and-shoot cameras have a macro function – usually symbolized by the icon of a little flower. When you turn on that function, you allow your camera to get closer to the subject, looking into a flower for example. Or getting up close and personal with a bug.More on desert photography and wildflower photos.

Water Conservation Gardening The vast majority of the water being used is wasted through evaporation, leaks, and run-off. Homeowners are not using the most efficient ways to water their landscaping and gardens. Not only are they wasting water, but they are increasing their monthly water bills. There are many ways that desert residents can have the gardens they desire while conserving precious water.

When will the desert wildflowers bloom? We start our report in January, plan your visit to coincide with the peak of the bloom – keep up to date with DesertUSA’s Wildflower Reports. Be sure to bookmark this page for weekly updates and sign up for our newsletter.

We’d like to see your pictures too. E-mail your digital photos and reports to Jim@desertusa.comUse Wildflower Report as the subject of your e-mail. Let us know where you took the photo and the date. We will post them on our wildflower reports. Thanks for your support and photos.

DesertUSA Newsletter — Each week we send articles on hiking, camping and places to explore. Animals, wildflower reports, plant information and much more. Sign up now (It’s Free).

Mojave Desert Wildflowers – This book is 210 printed pages with 200 color photos. More…


button

For other state reports click on link below

ArizonaCaliforniaNevadaNew MexicoTexas

Southern CA Wildflowers | Anza-Borrego DSP | Death Valley NP | Joshua Tree NP | Mojave NP

Back to Main Wildflower Page | Wildflower Field Guide

Mojave Desert Wildflowers book 200 color photos

Other DesertUSA Resources

Desert Plants
Wildflower Information & Hotlines
When Will The Wildflowers Bloom?

Related DesertUSA Pages


Wildflower book

Wildflower field guide ebook
Find the wildflowers by color – Kindle, iPads and Smart phones. $4.99

kindle button — iTunes link

 

 

Share this page on Facebook:


DesertUSA Newsletter — We send articles on hiking, camping and places to explore, as well as animals, wildflower reports, plant information and much more. Sign up below or read more about the DesertUSA newsletter here. (It’s Free.)

The Desert Environment
The North American Deserts
Desert Geological Terms

Read more: http://www.desertusa.com/wildflo/wildupdates.html#ixzz4cZZ5wCTA

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | March 27, 2017

Antelope Valley Poppies & Wildflowers 3/26/17

Antelope Valley California Poppy Reserve SNR reports

As of March 26th, the east end of the park is covered with poppies and patches are starting to fill in around other areas!  We do not expect a full carpet of poppies across the park, but many other flowers such as goldfields, lupine, and lacy phacelia are also creating a mosaic of color that changes daily.  Depending on the season’s weather, the bloom could last into mid to late April.

If possible, visiting on weekdays (Monday-Friday), is highly recommended. We are reaching full capacity on weekends, so by mid-morning the line to the entrance kiosk can be long or the entrance road may be closed altogether when the lots are full. Visitors may park on Lancaster Road and walk in for free, but must stay on the pavement and enter at the kiosk; visitors entering the park through the fenceline or by walking across the open fields from the road will be fined. Expect long lines for the restrooms on weekends.

Going off of the trails to walk in the poppies crushes the plants and may result in a ticket. DO NOT step off the official trail where others have already damaged plants or there is only bare dirt; it will compound the damage and leave a scar for years to come. No dogs, bikes, drones, or picking flowers.

Poppies curl up at night or if it’s cold so check the weather forecast before arriving.  The weather can change suddenly and it is frequently windy here during the spring.  This is a DESERT grassland, so drink water often.  Note that it can be very windy here in the spring.

Current Photos

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | March 27, 2017

Redwoods Reduce Impact Of Global Warming

The Mercury News reported how the Redwood Forests can help combat global warming

California’s ancient redwood forests aren’t just majestic and among the oldest living things on Earth — a new study finds they are a particularly potent weapon against global warming.

California’s ancient redwood forests aren’t just majestic and among the oldest living things on Earth — a new study finds they are a particularly potent weapon against global warming.

The towering trees remove and store more carbon from the atmosphere per acre than any other forests on the planet, including tropical rain forests, researchers found in a discovery that could influence everything from logging rules to how parks are preserved as the state grapples with climate change.

via Are California redwood trees the answer to global warming? – The Mercury News

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | March 26, 2017

North Bay Wildflower Photos 3/26/17

See photos for Ring Mt., Annadel State Park and Big Rock (on Lucas Valley Rd.) at the Marin CNPS Facebook page at Marin Native Plants

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | March 26, 2017

Hite Cove Wildflowers 3/26/17

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Today we hiked Hite Cove and made it out about two miles at our slow photographer/botanizing pace. As it was cloudy the poppies and gilia didn’t start to open until on the way out. It doesn’t look like there will be dense carpets of Poppies this year. The best displays were mainly Goldfields which began after entering the National Forest (the first 3/4 mile is through a right of way across private land). Most abundant are Blue Dicks, Bird’s Eye Gilia, and Goldfields. Many species are in bloom. See plant list.

Our plant of the day was White Fairy  Lantern/Calochortus albus (our third Calochortus of the year in our quest to see how many Calochortus species we can photograph).

Lots of grasses are coming up. Beware poison oak is along and sometimes across the trail including bare stems.

Click Read More to see plant list

Read More…

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | March 26, 2017

Red Rock Canyon Wildflowers

See a great photo of Red Rock Canyon State Park (just north of Mojave) of some beautiful patches of flowers at Wildflower Season – Michael Frye Photography

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | March 26, 2017

Texas Wildflowers 3/26/17

Gary Regner Photography reports

Brazos Valley / Hill Country Update

For those of you that are new to Texas, the wildflowers are looking good now in the Brazos Valley (area around Brenham) and in the Hill Country. The caveat is that they are limited almost exclusively to the roadsides only. Makes for an enjoyable drive, especially if you’ve never seen them before. That said, you will be hard pressed to find fields with any significant coverage. From a photographers perspective, there are no “WOW” scenes this year (at least that I’ve seen). The unseasonable heat and lack of rain in October are the most likely culprits. Late spring wildflowers may yet put on a good show in the fields, but I’m not very optomistic, I don’t see masses of plants out there. Roadsides are about average, but not great. Some recommended drives for roadside wildflowers and scenery:

  • – Hwy 29 between Burnet and Llano: Bluebonnets and paintbrush, and always a nice scenic drive; and you can’t beat the BBQ in Llano at Cooper’s
  • – Hwy 16 north of Llano: roadside bluebonnets and paintbrush, decent coverage, fields lacking
  • – Hwy 71 north and south of Llano: roadside bluebonnets, decent coverage, again fields lacking
Posted by: Sandy Steinman | March 26, 2017

What Makes A Frog’s Tongue So Sticky

The LA Times answers the question what makes a frog’s tongue so sticky

Frogs and amphibians can nab a fly with remarkable speed — but the real secret of their bug-catching prowess is in the saliva.

Sticky frog saliva is a non-Newtonian fluid. That means it can behave as both a liquid and a solid.

This unusual combination of tongue and saliva allows a frog to catch insects, mice or even small birds faster than you can blink — five times faster, in fact. Once captured, the prey is yanked back toward the frog’s mouth at a force up to 12 times greater than gravity.

So sophisticated is the frog tongue that it’s capable of grabbing prey up to 1.4 times the predator’s body weight — a feat unmatched by any man-made device.

Read full story at  What makes a frog’s tongue so sticky? The secret is in the spit – LA Times

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | March 25, 2017

Sierra Foothill Photos 3/25/17

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Click Read more to see today’s trip journal

Read More…

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | March 25, 2017

Coyote Creek, Oregon Wildflowers 3/22/17

Oregon Wildflowers reports on Coyote Creek

A number of species are blooming, particularly Grass Widows (Olsynium douglasii). Several people have posted photos (and a wonderful video) in the OW Facebook group. It is definitely worth a visit.

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | March 25, 2017

DesertUSA Wildflower Updates

DesertUSA’s new reports as of March 25

The 2017 desert’s super bloom wildflower season are past their prime in some areas, but there should still be many good area to see wildflowers for the next few weeks. Joshua Tree NP, Mojave Desert and Anza Borrego DSP have had cooler weather and wildflowers and cacuts are in bloom now. Southern California, Nevada and Arizona are also blooming. During the week is the best time to visit the desert. Reports below.

Arizona Deserts

California Deserts

More Areas

 

 

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | March 25, 2017

Fresno Blossom Trail 3/24/17

Blossom Trail Update reports on the Fresno Blossom trail on March 24, 2017

 2017 Blossom Season is now over – still a few blooms left, but most orchards starting next cycle (fruit/nut). Orange Blossoms & their amazing aroma can still be enjoyed through April.

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | March 24, 2017

Anza-Borrego Wildflower Updates 3/24/17

Anza-Borrego Desert State Park had a new report today

Wildflower Update March 24, 2017

ANZA-BORREGO DESERT STATE PARK® WILDFLOWER UPDATE 3-24-2017

Abundant winter rains have given us this lovely phenomenon of annual plants, shrubs, and cacti bursting into bloom this month, and we’re happy you’re here to see it, too.

Follow this route to see a variety of different wildflowers:

• Head east on Palm Canyon Drive (the “main drag” through our little town)

• Go past the traffic circle/roundabout that we call Christmas Circle

• Follow the highway as it continues east, then follow the road as it heads north (if you have time, check out the flowers—Dune Primrose and Sand Verbena, with a few Dune Sunflowers and Desert Lilies—blooming in the dunes along Old Springs Road, a paved road to the right at this corner)

• You should see white Dune Evening Primrose and pink Sand Verbena along the sides of the highway.

• Where the highway bends right to continue east, make a left turn onto Henderson Canyon Road (an alternative is to follow the highway to a great display near mile marker 31, then come back).

• You’ll see more pink and white, along with purple lupine, near the east end of Henderson Canyon Road, before arriving at the fields of yellow-orange Desert Sunflower. There should be lots of parking along this road. The freshest-looking sunflowers are in the eastern half of this field.

• Continue west on Henderson Canyon Road; you’ll see a field of flowers at the intersection with DiGiorgio Road; a left turn on either DiGiorgio or Borrego Springs Road will show you more flowers and bring you back to the center of town. A collection of large metal sculptures near the intersection of Henderson Canyon Road and Borrego Springs Road is worth checking out, too.

Read More…

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | March 24, 2017

Redbuds Blooming On Hwy, 140

Many Redbuds are now in bloom on Hwy. 14o East of Midpines.

Other flowers we found in bloom today were Fiddlenecks, Buck Brush (a white Ceaonothus), Blue Dicks, Popcorn, Woodland Star, Pretty Face Tritilea, White-leaf Manzanita, Goldfields and a yellow lomatium.

all photos today were with an iPhone.

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | March 24, 2017

Southern California Wildflower Reports 3/24/17

Theodore Payne Foundation posted its weekly wildflower report . It includes

  • Caspers Wildersness Park
  • Cleveland National Forest
  • Anza-Borrego
  • San Jacinto Valley
  • Diamond Valley Lake
  • Box Springs Road (to Mecca) and neighboring Painted Canyon
  • Ford Dry Lake, Cottonwood Springs, Red Cloud Mine Road
  • Joshua Tree
  • Amboy Crater
  • Mojave Trails National Monument
  • Antelope Valley
  • Red Rock State Park
  • Figueroa Mt.
  • Carrizo Plain National Monument
  • Hungry Valley SVRA
  • Environmental Nature Center in Newport Beach
  • Elizabeth Learning Center in Cudahy

 

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | March 24, 2017

Mt. Tamalpais Wildflowers 3/23/17

 

Charlie Russell of Wildflower Hikes reports on his hike on Mt. Tam

We visited Mount Tamalpais this week, hiking from the Rock Springs parking lot. On a loop that included the Simmons trail, Laurel Dell fire road, Potrero meadow, Rock Springs fire road and then the Bernstein trail, we found an interesting variety of early flowers. The star of the hike was the profusion of Fairy slipper orchids (Calypso bulbosa var. occidentalis) on every leg of the hike. Incredible numbers of them. We also found Milkmaids, Baby blue eyes, buttercups, miner’s lettuce, Indian warrior, blue dicks, Douglas iris, shooting stars, loco weed, California plantain, shooting stars (Primula hendersonii), a yellow violet, popcorn flower, purple sanicle, coast sanicle, and a quite a few varieties of Ceanothus in full bloom.

 

____________________

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | March 24, 2017

Why Wild Bees Are Important

Open Space Trust has a post on the importance of Wild Bees. Here a few significant excerpts

Wild, free ranging bees residing in natural open spaces are pollinating upwards of 39% of our crops in California.

These wild bees contribute the equivalent of up to $2.4 billion a year to the state’s agricultural economy!

There are about 1,600 species of wild bees in California and only two species of introduced honeybee.

They nest in our open space.

Read full post at Bee-nefits of Wild Bees – POST

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | March 24, 2017

Opposition To Trump Approval Of Keystone Pipeline

EarthJustice News Release

TRUMP ADMINISTRATION TRIES TO FAST-TRACK KEYSTONE XL PIPE DREAM

The following is a statement from Earthjustice Vice President of Litigation for Climate and Energy Abigail Dillen in response to the Trump administration’s announcement that it is granting a permit to the controversial and much-criticized Keystone XL tar sands oil pipeline:

“This is the latest in a string of decisions where the Trump administration is ignoring facts, public opinion and the law. As Arctic sea ice reaches its lowest level ever and rising seas flood Miami, we need to put the brakes on dirty fossil fuel projects and invest in clean energy. Instead, the current administration is trying to fast-track the Keystone XL pipeline—a literal pipe dream—and de-fund our clean energy investments. This decision defies all logic, not to mention the wishes of 75 percent of Americans who want our leaders to regulate climate pollution. In combination with all of their recent missteps, it’s as if the Trump administration is determined to go down as the most irrational and destructive presidential administration in history.”

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | March 23, 2017

Antelope Valley Poppies & Wildflowers 3/23/17

Antelope Valley California Poppy Reserve SNR reports

As of March 23rd, the east end of the park is covered with poppies and patches are starting to fill in around other areas!  We do not expect a full carpet of poppies across the park, but many other flowers such as goldfields, lupine, and lacy phacelia are also creating a mosaic of color that changes daily.  Depending on the season’s weather, the bloom could last into mid to late April.

Due to high visitation on weekends, the line to the entrance kiosk can be long by mid-morning. If possible, carpooling and visiting during the week are recommended. Visitors may park on Lancaster Road and walk in for free, but must stay on the pavement and enter at the kiosk. Mind the signs for legal parking areas on Lancaster Road. Visitors entering the park through the fenceline or by walking across the open fields will be fined.

Poppies open up on nice days, but they curl up at night or if it’s cold so check the weather forecast before arriving.  The weather can change suddenly and it is frequently windy here during the spring.  This is a DESERT grassland, so drink water often.

Note that it can be very windy here in the spring. Check the forecast before visiting and dress accordingly. Remember that going off of the trails to walk in the poppies crushes the plants and can result in a ticket (unless they’re growing on the official trails, and it can’t be avoided). No dogs, bikes, drones, or picking flowers.

Current Photos

 

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | March 23, 2017

Henry Coe Wildflower Update 3/23/17

13

Henry Coe State Park has a new wildflower bloom report  for March 23, 2017 at the Pine Ridge Association website with photos and a list of flowers now in bloom at: Henry W. Coe – Wildflower Guide.

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | March 23, 2017

DesertUSA Wildflower Updates

DesertUSA’s new reports as of March 24

Arizona Deserts

California Deserts

More Areas

 

Older Posts »

Categories

%d bloggers like this: