Posted by: Sandy Steinman | April 25, 2017

Jepson Prairie Photos 4/24/17

Photos taken yesterday at Jepson Prairie on a windy day.

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Posted by: Sandy Steinman | April 25, 2017

Homestead Valley Land Trust Wildflowers 4/25/17

Homestead Valley Land Trust reports on April 25

NEW
– Andrew’s clinton, the most exotic bloom of the redwood understory, has started blooming. Its large waxy leaves and bright pink flower can be seen from the road on the bank above Laverne opposite Stolte Grove.
– Sticky monkeyflower is blooming on Cowboy Rock. This is a sun loving plant that will bloom through the summer.

Forests
Starting
– Coralroot is blooming above the trail in the big Indian warrior patch. Look for it in the woods along the Homestead Trail.
– Crimson columbine, red with yellow heart, is a beautiful discovery in the forest or at the forest edge. It is blooming now on the Red Plum trail, near 10a and 11a.
– Hedge nettle with its tall stalk and purple flowers is blooming in the forests.
Peaking
– Forget-me-not* the familiar pretty little blue flower, is a European native. This is one of our most successful invasives covering the forest floor and crowding out native species.
– Fringe cups with its greenish fringed flowers is blooming in the forest beside creeks, next to the bridge on the Eagle trail near 9, along the Homestead Trail and on Laverne right after the last house.
– Pacific star flower, a member of the primrose family, is out with its pretty pink flower, its white center showing off its yellow tipped stamens. Another forest lover, it is blooming on the Eagle Trail between 6a and 6b.
– Thimbleberry, in the rose family, with its white flower and lobed leaves, is a forest shrub. The raspberry looking fruit is edible.
– Wood rose with its bright pink flowers is up at eye level along the forest paths.

Read More…

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | April 25, 2017

DesertUSA Wildflower Updates 4/25/17

Here are the links to DesertUSA‘s current wildflower bloom reports and photos.

April 25, 2017 – The 2017 superbloom wildflower season is over in the Carrizo Plain National Monument. It has passed its peak, but there are still some good areas to see wildflowers there. Wildflowers and cactus are still in bloom at the higher elevations. Nevada and Utah are now blooming.

DESERT WILDFLOWER UPDATES BY STATE AND PARKS

Arizona Deserts

California Deserts

More Areas

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | April 25, 2017

Audubon Bird Guide and APP

Audubon has a bird guide that is available both on-line or with an app. It includes in-depth profiles, range maps, photo galleries, and bird calls, you can discover lesser-known species or learn something new about one of your already beloved birds. Check out the Bird Guide online or download the Audubon Bird Guide app today.

 

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | April 24, 2017

DesertUSA Wildflower Updates 4/24/17

Here are the links to DesertUSA‘s current wildflower bloom reports and photos.

The 2017 superbloom wildflower season is over in the Carrizo Plain National Monument. It has passed its peak, but there are still some good areas to see wildflowers there. Wildflowers and cactus are still in bloom at the higher elevations. Nevada and Utah are now blooming.

DESERT WILDFLOWER UPDATES BY STATE AND PARKS

Arizona Deserts

California Deserts

More Areas

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | April 24, 2017

Homestead Valley Land Trust Wildflowers 4/24/17

Homestead Valley Land Trust reports on April 24

NEW
– Cow parsnip, this tall plant with large white umbels is blooming at the forest edge.
– Filaree, a small purple flower native to the Mediterranean, is blooming in meadows.
– Hedge nettle with its tall stalk and purple flowers is blooming in the forests.
– Meadow rue has a pretty pink flower atop a tall stalk with lacy leaves and is blooming in the creek on the Upper Eagle trail.
– Scarlet pimpernel, native to the Mediterranean basin, is a common little orange splash in the meadow grasses.
– Shortspur seablush grows in groups and is flowering on the Ridgewood Rock and the Upper Eagle.
– Purple western morning glory is blooming in meadows up on the ridge and on Kerouac Hill.
– Wood rose with its bright pink flowers is up at eye level along the forest paths.

Forests
Starting
– Coralroot is blooming above the trail in the big Indian warrior patch. Look for it in the woods along the Homestead Trail.
– Crimson columbine, red with yellow heart, is a beautiful discovery in the forest or at the forest edge. It is blooming now on the Red Plum trail, near 10a and 11a.
Peaking
– Forget-me-not* the familiar pretty little blue flower, is a European native. This is one of our most successful invasives covering the forest floor and crowding out native species.
– Fringe cups with its greenish fringed flowers is blooming in the forest beside creeks, next to the bridge on the Eagle trail near 9, along the Homestead Trail and on Laverne right after the last house.
– Pacific star flower, a member of the primrose family, is out with its pretty pink flower, its white center showing off its yellow tipped stamens. Another forest lover, it is blooming on the Eagle Trail between 6a and 6b.
– Thimbleberry, in the rose family, with its white flower and lobed leaves, is a forest shrub. The raspberry looking fruit is edible.

Read More…

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | April 24, 2017

Antelope Valley Wildflowers 4/24/17

Antelope Valley California Poppy Reserve SNR reports

As of April 24th, a few patches of poppies are still blooming across the western slopes but most other wildflowers have faded to a brown background. The beavertail cactus in front of the visitor center is in bloom and Acton encelia and buckwheat are beginning to bloom on Kitanemuk Vista Point.

Visitors may park on Lancaster Road and walk in for free, but must stay along the entrance road and enter at the kiosk; visitors entering the park through the fenceline or by walking across the open fields from the road will be fined.

Stay on OFFICIAL TRAILS only. Walking in the poppies crushes all of the wildflowers and will result in a ticket. DO NOT walk where others have already damaged plants or there is only bare dirt; it will compound the damage and leave a scar for years to come. No dogs, bikes on trails, drones, or picking flowers.

Poppies open up in mid morning, and curl up in the late afternoon or if it’s cold so check the weather forecast before arriving.  The weather can change suddenly and it is frequently windy here during the spring.  This is a DESERT grassland, so drink water often.  Note that it can be very windy here in the spring.

Current Photos

 

 

 

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | April 24, 2017

Hungry Valley Wildflowers 4/23/17

Hungry Valley OHV has a new wildflower  report for 4/23/17

A few more poppies are being seen, but in some areas the grass is getting so tall it is hard to see the flowers. Look for them in the grasslands near the north entrance and along the freeway frontage road between Gorman and Quail Lake Road to see some of the best displays so far.

Heading into the park from the north will take you past some nice bush lupine and the sunflower-looking balsam root. The fiddleneck flowers that have faded in the grasslands have taken over much of the valley floor, adding their golden hue to the yellow landscape. The desert primrose is beginning to make an appearance and are easy to identify from the big white flowers.

The purple sage is in full bloom along the S curves near Smith Forks and on the road toward Piru Creek and a lot of scarlet buglers are being seen. More and more of the yucca are blooming and are starting to put on a show between Aliklik and Lane Ranch campgrounds.

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | April 24, 2017

Peoples Climate March 4/29/2017

Join the Peoples Climate Movement this April 29th in Washington, D.C. and sister marches across the country to stand up for our communities and climate. Everything we have struggled to move forward in the United States is in peril. Our loved ones feel under siege, and those in power in Washington are advancing a dark and dangerous vision of America that we know is untrue.

For more information and to find a local march near you go Peoples Climate Movement 2017

 

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | April 23, 2017

Marin County Wildflowers 4/23/17

The Marin County CNPS Facebook page has photos from recent trips to San Geronimo Ridge, Las Gallinas Water Treatment Plant, Soulajule Reservoir and the nearby Marshall-Petaluma Rd. and Bates Meadow.

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | April 23, 2017

March For Science Photos

Some quick iPhone photos from yesterday’s March for Science in San Francisco

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Posted by: Sandy Steinman | April 23, 2017

National Parks Are Good For The Economy

Yosemite National Park News Release

Tourism to Yosemite National Park Creates $686,339,500 in Economic Benefits

A new National Park Service (NPS) report shows that 5,028,868 visitors to Yosemite National Park in 2016 spent $520,629,100 in communities near the park. That spending supported 7883 jobs in the local area and had a cumulative benefit to the local economy of $686,339,500.

“Yosemite National Park welcomes visitors from across the country and around the world,” said Acting Superintendent Chip Jenkins. “We are delighted to share the story of this place and the experiences it provides. We also feature the park as a way to introduce our visitors to this part of the country and all that it offers. National park tourism is a significant driver in the national economy, returning more than $10 for every $1 invested in the National Park Service, and it’s a big factor in our local economy as well. We appreciate the partnership and support of our neighbors and are glad to be able to give back by helping to sustain local communities.”

Gateway communities along the Highway 120, Highway 140, and Highway 41 corridors provide a wide variety of recreational opportunities and services to help meet the diverse interests and needs of the over 5 million visitors who travel to Yosemite National Park. “We are a proud partner of the Yosemite Gateway communities and the many small businesses that provide services for visitors traveling to Yosemite National Park throughout the year.”

The peer-reviewed visitor spending analysis was conducted by economists Catherine Cullinane Thomas of the U.S. Geological Survey and Lynne Koontz of the National Park Service.  The report shows $18.4 billion of direct spending by 331 million park visitors in communities within 60 miles of a national park. This spending supported 318,000 jobs nationally; 271,544 of those jobs are found in these gateway communities. The cumulative benefit to the U.S. economy was $34.9 billion.

Read More…

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | April 22, 2017

DesertUSA Wildflower Updates 4/22/17

Here are the links to DesertUSA‘s current wildflower bloom reports and photos.

April 22, 2017 – The 2017 superbloom wildflower season is over in the Carrizo Plain National Monument. It has passed its peak but there are still some good areas to see wildflowers. Joshua Tree NP, Mojave Desert and Anza Borrego DSP have had cooler weather and some wildflowers and cactus are still in bloom at the higher elevations. The heat is coming back this weekend, Nevada and Utah are now blooming.

DESERT WILDFLOWER UPDATES BY STATE AND PARKS

Arizona Deserts

California Deserts

More Areas

 

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | April 22, 2017

Happy Earth Day 

HAPPY EARTH DAY

How are you celebrating Earth Day?

I will be marching for Science in San Francisco.

Watch the March for Science in Washington DC at Livestream NOW! #EarthDay2017

Source: Earth Day Network on Google

Read in the Washington Post Why Are People Marching for Science ‘There is no Planet B

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | April 22, 2017

Antelope Valley Wildflowers 4/20/17

 Mojave Desert Interpretive Association  reports

There are still poppies at the reserve but they are starting to fade. They are completing their growing cycle and starting to form their seed pods.

There has been a lot of off trail damage with all the visitors…Please stay on the trails

See full report and photos at  Mojave Desert Interpretive Association

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | April 22, 2017

Interview With Birding Big Year Record Holder

The New York Times has an interview with Noah Strycker, who holds the big year record for most bird species seen in one year. Read the interview in which he discusses his favorite birding locations, best spots to observe bird migration and best place to spot several species at once at Big Birder: Noah Strycker on Where to Spot Rare Species

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | April 21, 2017

Anza-Borrego Desert Wildflowers Species In Bloom 4/21/17

Anza-Borrego Desert Wildflowers has the following new reports

04/21 A return to the PCT, now between Angelina spring and the water stop.
One of the goals was to check out the Nemacladus ramosissimus we found on our last trip along the PCT, at that time not in bloom.
Most prominent bloomers along the PCT: Desert globemallow, Sphaeralcea ambigua rugosa and Yellow tackstem, Calycoseris parryi
We found Nemacladus ramosissimus way earlier and in good numbers along our trail.
So far we are finding only Long flowered threadplant, Nemacladus longiflorus var. longiflorus in the Anza-Borrego Desert, but no breviflorus.
The bloom is visibly going downhill, but surprisingly the bloom count doesn’t show this feeling.
Species in bloom below 3000 feet: 52.
Species in bloom above 3000 feet: 106+2 along the road.
04/19 A visit to Culp Valley up Culp Valley Road and a short hike.
Species in bloom above 3000 feet: 71.

Read More…

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | April 21, 2017

Marin County Wildflowers 4/21/17

The Marin CNPS Facebook page has photos from recent trips to Lucas Valley Rd.,Soulajule Resevoir, Mt. Burdell, Marin Headlands, Old Stage Road, Rock Spring Trail, and Old Mine Trail, at  Marin Native Plants

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | April 21, 2017

Henry Coe Wildflower Update 4/21/17

Henry Coe State Park has a new wildflower bloom report  for April 21, 2017 at the Pine Ridge Association website with photos and a list of flowers now in bloom at: Henry W. Coe – Wildflower Guide.

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | April 21, 2017

Oregon Wildflowers: Camissia Area 4/21/17

Oregon Wildflowers reports

Camassia looks good, with the following wildflowers in bloom: Common Camas, Oregon fawn lilies, Trillium, Rosy Plectritis, and Blue-Eyed Mary.

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | April 21, 2017

Lyrid Meteor Shower Peaks Tonight

NPR  reports on the Lyrid Meteor Shower peaking tonight

Space.com also predicts conditions will be “good-to-excellent” for North American skywatchers, as “25-day-old waning crescent moon will not rise until after 4 a.m. local time on April 22, thus assuring dark skies most of the night.”

Lyrids aren’t generally as numerous as some other annual meteor showers, but they tend to be bright and fast. So wake early or stay up late, celestial searchers, and take NASA’s standing advice: “Simply find a dark, open sky away from artificial lights. Lie down comfortably on a blanket or lawn chair, and look straight up.”

via Lights Off, Blankets Out: Lyrid Meteor Shower Peaks Tonight : The Two-Way : NPR

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | April 21, 2017

Southern California Wildflower Reports 4/21/17

Theodore Payne Foundation posted its weekly wildflower report .

This is Native Plant Week, ending on Saturday, April 22, Earth Day! It’s been a tough time to enjoy natives during the drought years, but this year you should definitely get out and delight in what a little rain can do and appreciate our State’s remarkable flora.

This week’s reports include

  • Descanso Gardens
  • Santa Monica Mts. NRA
  • Carrizo Plain National Monument
  • Figueroa Mt. in Los Padres National Forest
  • Hungry Valley SVRA
  • Antelope Valley
  • Placerita Canyon Natural Area
  • Anza-Borrego Desert State Park
  • Joshua Tree National Monument
  • Environmental Nature Center in Newport Beach
  • Elizabeth Learning Center

See full report and photos at: http://theodorepayne.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/11/21-AprilReport_2-.pdf

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | April 21, 2017

Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden Wildflower Show April 22

WILDFLOWER SHOW, SAGE EVENT AT THE GARDEN The California Wildflower Show takes place April 22, 2017 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden, 1500 N. College Ave., Claremont. “Experience the garden in full bloom, witness a dazzling array of California wildflowers collected throughout Southern California and enjoy family-friendly activities,” a press release stated. Garden members receive early access from 8 to 10 a.m. The show is free with general admission or membership. Also at RSABG is “Sage is the Rage!” from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Grow Native Nursery. More info is at rsabg.org or (909) 625-8767.

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | April 21, 2017

Happy Birthday John Muir

Happy birthday to America’s most famous naturalist and conservationist: John Muir! Born April 21, 1838, he shared his love of the outdoors through writing and inspired people to protect our country’s wild places like Yosemite, Grand Canyon and Sequoia & King’s Canyon national parks — earning him the nickname the Father of the National Parks. What better way to honor Muir’s memory than by getting outside and exploring your public lands: https://on.doi.gov/2p3hcX7.

via (1) U.S. Department of the Interior – Home

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | April 21, 2017

Santa Monica Wildflowers 4/21/17

Santa Monica Mts. National Recreation Area reports

Reports are that this is the best flower season the Santa Monica’s have seen in years.

Circle X Ranch- Mishe Mokwa Loop 4/15/17

This is always an amazing hike filled with different habitats and the plants that inhabit them. We began our hike from the second parking lot after you pass the park visitor center, the one marked as the Mishe Mokwa trailhead. When we came to the Backbone Trail we turned left onto it and made a clockwise loop going to Sandstone Peak and then Split Rock before returning to the parking lot, about 6 miles.
We were barely out of the parking lot before we were overwhelmed at the quantity of butterfly mariposa lilies, they filled the grasslands and trail edges, I don’t remember ever seeing so many. There was also blooming yucca, yarrow, black sage, popcorn flower, California chicory, chia, star lilies, twining snapdragon and yellow monkey flower. As we climbed toward Sandstone Peak we saw blooming chamise, sticky monkey flower, collarless poppies, mustard evening primrose and beautiful bush lupines. On the trail up to Sandstone Peak there were clumps of blooming phlox. Walking from Sandstone Peak to Split Rock there were blooming globe gilia, larkspur, yellow pin cushion and owls clover. Approaching Split Rock there are blue and white ceanothus that are not the usually found ones that are especially beautiful. From Split Rock back to the parking lot there were great patches of virgins bower, delicate woodland stars, parry’s phacelia, shiny lomatium, more blue dicks than can be imagined and a few of the flower we were hoping to find, chocolate lilies. It was a wonderful hike.

See older reports and photos at What’s Blooming

Santa Monica Mt. Quick Links:
Wildflowers of the Santa Monica Mountains – Photos of 1000 SMM plants.
Archive – Previous “What’s Blooming” reports.
Outdoors – The Calendar of Events for the Santa Monica Mountains NRA.
SMM WildFlowers – The Park’s popular wildflower app for the iPhone.
New! SMM WildFlowers – The Park’s popular wildflower app for Android smartphones (Pre-Release Beta Version)

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | April 21, 2017

Bear Valley Wildflowers 4/20/17

Where to photograph in California – Yahoo Groups (cal photo) has a comment on Bear Valley
no expansive vistas a la  Carrizo Plains, but lots of nice (common to the area) flowers…
Posted by: Sandy Steinman | April 21, 2017

Drilling For Oil In National Parks?

Vox.com reports

Trump wants to make it easier to drill in national parks. We mapped the 42 parks at risk

It’s no secret that oil and gas companies are on the hunt for new places to drill. But the quest for more fossil fuels could heat up in places you might not expect: our national parks.

With President Donald Trump’s executive order on energy, federal agencies are now reviewing all rules that inhibit domestic energy production. And that includes regulations around drilling in national parks that, if overturned, could give oil and gas companies easier access to leases on federal lands they’ve long coveted.

Read full story and see map at : Trump wants to make it easier to drill in national parks. We mapped the 42 parks at risk. – Vox

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | April 20, 2017

Joshua Tree Wildflowers 4/20/17

Joshua Tree National Park (U.S. National Park Service) reports

Remember

  1. Do not pick wildflowers. Leave them for others to enjoy and to reproduce so they can come back next year.
  2. Watch your footing when you view and photograph wildflowers. Many visitors have trampled the wildflowers. Again, this ruins the flower viewing experience for others, and the flower won’t be able to reproduce for future year’s bloom.
  3. Wait until you reach a pull out to park your car, and park in designated areas only. Parking illegally poses a danger to everyone and destroys wildflowers that may be on the roadside.

The blooms are  still colorful and worth seeing in the southern part of the park near Cottonwood and really coming into their own in the western portion of the park. The colorful bloom continues near the north entrance. Wildflowers are starting to become more abundant at the higher elevation areas, such as Keys View Rd.

Please take a look at past blog posts, as the information in the past reports is still relevant and will help with species identification. And be sure to visit and contribute to our iNaturalist Wildflower Watch Project.

Southern Half of the Park

Cottonwood Springs Road and Bajada Trail
The blooms along Cottonwood Springs Road are peaking or a little past peak at lower elevations. Purple mat, Nama demissa, is spreading along the sand with its vibrant purple flowers. You can only find purple mat blooming between April and May and at elevations between 2,000 and 5,500 feet.  The sand blazing star is throwing out its ghostly white flowers with its friend the desert star. The strikingly otherworldly ocotillo blooms are peaking as well. Ocotillos actually have the potential to flower all year round, but they only bloom after it rains. The beloved golden poppies have mostly gone along with Encelia farinosa.

Western Half of the Park

Geology Tour Road
If you have four-wheel drive, head down Geology Tour Road to check out the lavender Mojave desert aster. The Mojave aster has been used in the past as perfume because of its fragrant properties. You can also see fields of white and yellow thanks to the Acton’s encelia, Parish Viguera, desert dandelion, and pincushion. Parish’s onion is also starting to come and can be seen growing among the rocks.
The spherical Parish’s onion, Allium parishii, and violet Mojave desert aster are hanging around Geo Tour Road. You can find Parish’s onion growing in Arizona’s Sonoran desert, too.

Read More…

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | April 20, 2017

Lake County Wildflowers: Redbud Trail 4/20/17 – updated

Submitted by Charlie Russell Wildflower Hikes

Yesterday I hiked the Redbud Trail in Lake County, taking the five mile round trip from the parking lot off of Highway 20 out to Cache Creek and back. Cache Creek has too much water to continue on the trail past that point. While the grass is much higher this year, obscuring the vistas of flowers that I saw last year, there still are a tremendous number of flowers to be seen. Here’s the list of what I found this year, as far as I have identified so far.

Tall Snapdragon, Fiddleneck, multiple species of Lupine including Sky Lupine, Miniature Lupine, Butter Lupine, Blow Wives, Valley tassles, popcorn flower, Butter ‘n Eggs, Q-tips, Purple Owl’s Clover, Ithuriel’s Spear, Wallflower, Blue Dicks, several Lomatiums including the rare Hoover’s Lomatium, Wild Onion, Small flowered Nemophila, Man-root, Buttercups, Blue eyed grass, Golden fairy lantern, Chinese Houses, Hillside Collinsia, several species of Larkspur including Western Larkspur, Indian clover, Dwarf Sack Clover, Purple Sanicle, Indian Warrior, Miner’s Lettuce, Yarrow, Chilean Trefoil, Windmill Pink, Bird’s Eye Gilia, Ground Iris, Chia Sage, California Poppy, Purple Needle Grass, and others I haven’t identified yet.

Read More…

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | April 20, 2017

Washington Wildflowers: Round Lake 4/19/17

Oregon Wildflowers reports on  the Camas lily fields at Round Lake, Lacamas Park, Camas, WA

Blooming: fawn lily, small pink flower that I don`t know Barely starting: camas lily

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