Posted by: Sandy Steinman | February 23, 2020

Wildflower Reports Around California 2/23/20

California Wildflower Report has the following updates

  • Mojave desert near Dove springs blooming this weekend. Bloom is still in early stages…some flowers spotted were milkvetch, evening snow, goldfields, gilia, popcorn flowers, lacy phacelia, fiddleneck, wild parsley, filaree, daisy’s and some California poppies.
  • February/20/2020 Algodones Dunes East Loop
    Probably the best display of flowers that we know of, right now..
    https://borregowildflowers.org/pages/blooming.html
    North Algodones Dunes Wilderness Area
  • [Arizona lupine (Lupinus arizonicus) in the lower badlands, 2/21/2020

California Wildflower Tipline has the following updates

  • Hound’s Tongue and Trillium at Schilling Lake Trail, Thornewood Open Space Preserve, Woodside
  • Fetid Adder’s Tongue, Scoliopus bigelovii  at Henry Cowell Redwood State Park, Felton, CA
  • California Pipevine and Manroot at Lake Natoma, CA.
  • Mosquito bill, Primula hendersonii, on the Manhattan Canyon trail in the Black Diamond Mines Regional Preserve, near Mount Diablo, on Feb 19

Anza-Borrego Wildflowers Guide

  • February/23/2020 Ella Wash East Loop
    We immediately rescheduled our trip to Coachwhip to check out a spurge posted on iNaturalist.
    This might be a Euphorbia ocellata arenicola | Contura creek spurge, but looked different from our previous find.
    Our previous find is now gone, only the skeleton remains, maybe in another year.
    Still an interesting area to visit, a lot of bloom originated from a October 2019 rain.
    A lot of big flowering Hesperocallis undulata | Desert lily around.

Marin CNPS 

  • Fritillaria liliacea (fragrant fritillary) seen yesterday at Mt. Burdell Open Space Preserve in Marin.
  • Fetid Adder’s Tongue at north side of King Mountain today.

Homestead Valley has new update at February 23, 2020

Go to each site for photos and older postings.

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | February 23, 2020

Homestead Valley Land Trust Wildflowers 2/22/2020

Homestead Valley has a new wildflower update. See photos and maps at February 22 2020

NEW
– Barberry’s leaves are pointy like a holly; its flowers are blooming bright yellow with fragrant flowers in the meadow below Amaranth.
– California poppy’s bright orange flowers are blooming in meadows.
– Canyon gooseberry with its little Chinese lantern red and white flowers is blooming in the forest near 16.
– Coast live oak is blooming with pale yellow tassels.

Forests
– Bay trees’ yellow clusters of flowers are filling the air with their sweet vanilla scent.
– Fairy bells, low and branching with white bell flowers hanging under the leaves is blooming in forests.
– False lily of the valley with its ladder of pointed leaves and white star flowers is blooming in forests.
– Fetid adder’s tongue, a small lily with distinctive red mottled leaves, is blooming at several locations in the forest along the Homestead Trail.
– Hazel, a common deciduous shrub in the forest is waking up and the female flowers are very small tassels of bright red.
– Indian warrior’s burgundy plumes are spreading down the hill below 15 on the Homestead Trail.
– Manroot, a vine in the gourd family with large leaves and white flowers is blooming in forests.
– Milkmaids with their white flowers is starting to bloom in the forests.
– Oso berry is blooming with arching white, fragrant flowers on the Ridgewood Rock. Also called Indian plum, this shrub was an important source of food and medicine for native Americans.
– Trilium is blooming under bay trees in the forest near the water tank at 6d.

Forest edge
– Arroyo willow is blooming in the gully at Laverne and Reed.
– Pacific hounds tongue with its bright blue flowers on tall stalks with large arrow leaves is blooming at forest edges.
– Woodland strawberry, a common ground cover at forest edges is starting to bloom white.

Meadows
– Checker lily has started blooming with chocolate bells and yellow spots in the meadows below Amaranth.
– Footsteps of spring is blooming in the middle of the trail at 7j below the Homestead Hill.
– Fremont’s deathcamas’s cluster of white star flowers is blooming in the meadow below Amaranth.
– Scotch broom*, one of the most aggressive invasive shrubs in Homestead is starting to bloom with bright yellow pea flowers in meadows.
– Wooly lomatium, in the carrot family, with lacy foliage and white wooly umbels is blooming in meadows up on the Homestead Hill

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | February 23, 2020

Wales a haven for wildlife – but for how long?

The BBC reports

From slugs to spiders and bees to bottlenose dolphins – Wales is proving a haven for many species.

Its varied landscape and mild climate make Wales among Europe’s “best wildlife-watching secrets”, according to the Wildlife Trust.

Those secrets include a spider only found in Welsh caves, a fly unique to a north Wales river and a flesh-eating slug first found in a Cardiff garden.

However one in six species of wildlife, plants and fungi remain endangered.

Read more at Wales a haven for wildlife – but for how long? – BBC News

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | February 22, 2020

Anza-Borrego Wildflowers 2/20/20

Borrego Wildflowers  reports on February/20/2020 Algodones Dunes East Loop


Probably the best display of flowers that we know of, right now..

Most striking are the thousands upon thousands of Sphaeralcea coulteri | Coulter’s globemallow in bloom.
With this many in bloom finding a white/yellow version was expected, cool.

Huge Brandegea bigelovii | Desert star vine in full bloom, producing a very strong smell
From the sand dunes you can smell them from hundreds of yards away.
It gets competition from the endless fields of Cryptantha angustifolia | Narrow leaf cryptantha.

Our guess, plants germinated around October 2019, resulting in hundreds of huge Oenothera deltoides deltoides | Dune evening primrose.

We were lucky to spot a Uma notata | Colorado Desert fringe-toed lizard, playing possum until I got a little bit too close.
A typical sand dune plant is Eriogonum deserticola | Dune buckwheat, growing all arround the dunes.

Species in bloom: 58.

See photos and older reports at  Bloom report out of the Anza-Borrego Desert

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | February 22, 2020

Donald Trump Jr granted permit to hunt Alaska grizzly bear 

The Guardian reports

Donald Trump Jr has been granted the right to hunt a grizzly bear in north-western Alaska near the Bering Sea town of Nome, a state official says.

Read story at : Donald Trump Jr granted permit to hunt Alaska grizzly bear | US news | The Guardian

The Guardian

Authorities tranquillized the animal and took her to a forest, but it’s not uncommon for wildlife to wander into neighborhoods

A large black bear roams the streets of a suburb in Los Angeles. Photograph: APA big, old bear wandered a Los Angeles foothill suburb Friday, drawing curious onlookers and news media before wildlife authorities removed it.

The bear sluggishly ambled along streets and into backyards in Monrovia, which sits at the foot of the San Gabriel mountains.

Read more at  Ursus urbinus: ‘elderly’ 400lb bear spotted roaming Los Angeles suburb | US news | The Guardian

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | February 21, 2020

Anza-Borrego Wildflowers 2/19/20

Anza-Borrego Wildflowers Guide   reports February/19/2020  on North Coyote Mountain Loop

Bloom is good in the Rockhouse Canyon wash.
Wow many Encelia farinosa phenicodonta | Purple eyed brittlebush, by far the prettiest variation.

Fields of Malacothrix glabrata , Desert dandelion everywhere close to the Rockhouse Canyon wash.
Large fields of blooming Allionia incarnata incarnata | Small flowered trailing windmills.

The hike is pleasant at first but turns into a rocky wash with little sand.
A good climb out of the wash up to the top of the loop.
Unfortunately another even rockier wash down.
The goal was to see more bloom, but bloom was almost absent higher up except for countless happy Fagonia laevis | California fagonia.

Species in bloom: 63.

See photos at Anza-Borrego Wildflowers Guide

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | February 21, 2020

Saguaro National Park Wildflowers 2/21/20

Saguaro National Park reports We’ve started seeing these beautiful spring flowers (among others!) all over the park lately!

 

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | February 21, 2020

Pentachaeta Trail Wildflower Bloom 2/21/20

See photos for flowers in bloom on the Pentachaeta trail this week, Westlake Village, Los Angeles County at California Wildflower Tipline

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | February 21, 2020

Fresno Blossom Trail 2/21/20

Fresno County Office of Tourism – Blossom Trail reports on February 21 2020

Reports of Almond Orchards in full bloom (white blossoms), and several sightings of apricot and early peach blooms (pink). Weather forecast calls for a passing morning shower with some clouds on Saturday – highs in the mid 60s, but then sunny through Thursday. Expect some good blossom viewing this weekend, with increasing blooms over the next 7 days.

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | February 21, 2020

Santa Monica Mountains Wildflowers 2/19/20

Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area has a new report

Topanga State Park Dead Horse Trail 2/19/20
         This is a trail between Trippet Ranch and the Dead Horse Parking lot. It alternates chaparral with patches of woodlands. In the shady woodlands miner’s lettuce is coming into flower. The chaparral areas are filled with blooming eastwood manzanitas, a fair amount of flowering wild cucumber, a bit of purple nightshade and fuchsia flowering gooseberry and just above the bridge the first blooming wild peonies that I have seen this year.
Quick Links:
How To Submit a Flower Report – Anyone can participate!
Wildflowers of the Santa Monica Mountains – Photos of 1000 SMM plants.
Archive – Previous “What’s Blooming” reports.
Calendar – Schedule of Events for the Santa Monica Mountains NRA.
SMM WildFlowers – The Park’s popular wildflower app for the iPhone.
SMM WildFlowers – The Park’s popular wildflower app for Android smartphones (Pre-Release Beta Version).
This site performs a public service that anyone can participate in. Let us all know what you are seeing! If you are new to submitting a report (or maybe even an old hand at it) be sure and read How To Submit a Flower Report
Posted by: Sandy Steinman | February 21, 2020

Noise Pollution Threatens Animals and Humans

National Parks Conservation Association reports

A growing body of research shows that noise can be harmful to humans and animals. Can natural quiet be saved?

Research has shown that the modern whir not only affects the behavior of wild animals, it’s also making us sick. High noise levels have been linked to heart disease, stroke, sleep disturbance and reduced workplace productivity. A 2011 World Health Organization report suggested that traffic noise significantly cut healthy life expectancy among Western Europeans.

Read full story at Hush… · National Parks Conservation Association

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | February 20, 2020

Marin Wildflowers: Cascade Canyon 2/19/20

Marin CNPS reports

Things are really starting to pop! Did a ramble up Cascade Cyn. in Fairfax this morning and saw many things flowering or making buds. See photos at https://www.facebook.com/gosner/media_set?set=a.10221814675062171&type=3https://www.facebook.com/gosner/media_set…

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | February 20, 2020

Homestead Valley Land Trust Wildflowers 2/19/2020

Homestead Valley has a new wildflower update. See photos and maps at February 19, 2020

NEW
– Hazel, a common deciduous shrub in the forest is waking up and the female flowers are very small tassels of bright red.
– Oso berry is blooming with arching white, fragrant flowers on the Ridgewood Rock. Also called Indian plum, this shrub was an important source of food and medicine for native Americans.

Forests
– Bay trees’ yellow clusters of flowers are filling the air with their sweet vanilla scent.
– Fairy bells, low and branching with white bell flowers hanging under the leaves is blooming in forests.
– False lily of the valley with its ladder of pointed leaves and white star flowers is blooming in forests.
– Fetid adder’s tongue, a small lily with distinctive red mottled leaves, is blooming at several locations in the forest along the Homestead Trail.
– Indian warrior’s burgundy plumes are spreading down the hill below 15 on the Homestead Trail.
– Manroot, a vine in the gourd family with large leaves and white flowers is blooming in forests.
– Milkmaids with their white flowers is starting to bloom in the forests.
– Trilium is blooming under bay trees in the forest near the water tank at 6d.

Forest edge
– Arroyo willow is blooming in the gully at Laverne and Reed.
– Pacific hounds tongue with its bright blue flowers on tall stalks with large arrow leaves is blooming at forest edges.
– Woodland strawberry, a common ground cover at forest edges is starting to bloom white.

Meadows
– Checker lily has started blooming with chocolate bells and yellow spots in the meadows below Amaranth.
– Footsteps of spring is blooming in the middle of the trail at 7j below the Homestead Hill.
– Fremont’s deathcamas’s cluster of white star flowers is blooming in the meadow below Amaranth.
– Scotch broom*, one of the most aggressive invasive shrubs in Homestead is starting to bloom with bright yellow pea flowers in meadows.
– Wooly lomatium, in the carrot family, with lacy foliage and white wooly umbels is blooming in meadows up on the Homestead Hill

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | February 20, 2020

North Table Mountain Wildflowers 2/19/20

The North Table Mountain Ecological Reserve is coming alive. Today, we found lots of sporadic blooms. Get your flower guide and head up there to check it out.

See photos at http://www.chicohiking.org/…/fieldguides/Phantom/PhantomFlo…

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | February 20, 2020

Henry Coe Wildflower Update 2/19/20

Henry Coe State Park has a new report for wildflowers currently in bloom. See what is currently flowering at the Pine Ridge Association website with photos and a list of flowers now in bloom at: Henry W. Coe – Wildflower Guide.

 

 

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | February 20, 2020

Anza-Borrego Foundation Wildflower Report & Map 2/19/20

The Anza-Borrego Foundation reports

2020’s wildflower bloom is just starting!

Small areas of blooms are now being seen throughout the Park. We need more rain to have a “Superbloom”, but if you’re willing to venture away from paved roads, you’ll be rewarded with small patches of flowers.

View our downloadable map for details!

The Guardian reports

In a move to protect its ski slopes and growing economy, Utah – one of the reddest states in the nation – has just created a long-term plan to address the climate crisis.

Read article at: Red-state Utah embraces plan to tackle climate crisis in surprising shift | Environment | The Guardian

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | February 19, 2020

Dry Winter, No Superblooms – updated

Updated

Newspapers across California are publishing articles about the dry winter and decreasing chances of a superbloom. No one can absolutely know what the weather will be and how that will effect this year’s wildflower season. However, given the current rainfall, snowpack and dry predictions for the next couple of weeks at seems unlikely to be a good wildflower. Here is what some of the newspapers are saying.

Wildflower forecast: Will there be another superbloom in California this year? – SFGate
San Francisco Chronicle – a few excerpts

The best locations will likely be in the high-desert — higher elevations of Anza Borrego State Park and Joshua Tree National Park — where rare snowfall in December has helped keep the ground moist.

“Three hours northwest of Joshua Tree, Antelope Valley California Poppy Reserve may also receive some flowers. “We’re currently predicting a moderate bloom,” said Jean Rhyne, a state park interpreter for the Great Basin District, Mojave Area. “There are some patches with lots of poppy sprouts, and patches with only a few here and there. The buds are just beginning to form and the first couple of flowers have now been spotted. We have not yet received the minimum amount of precipitation that is typically necessary for a good bloom, so if we don’t get more rain, we may have a short season.”

Minnich believes low-desert locations such as Death Valley National Park will experience paltry blooms. “I think they’ve had less than an inch,” he said. “It’s not going to be good there.”

Lake Elsinore is also highly unlikely to see flowers similar to last year’s much-Instagrammed profusion.

California’s Sierra Nevada snowpack barely half of normal | The Sacramento Bee
The snowpack in the Sierra Nevada is a sad whisper of it was a year ago, a withering testament to the lack of precipitation in the state’s increasingly dry winter.

Dry winter may mean no repeat of ‘superbloom’ chaos in Lake Elsinore
Santa Rosa Press Democrat
LAKE ELSINORE — Southern California’s dry winter isn’t good for wildflowers and that’s OK with officials in the city of Lake Elsinore where last spring’s ..

California’s Dry Winter Could Jeopardize Super Bloom
KSRO
California’s dry winter could mean no super bloom this spring. … in the next months, this year will not see as many colorful poppies and wildflowers

Dry Winter May Mean No ‘Super Bloom’
CBS Sacramento
California’s dry winter means we may not have an epic “super bloom” of Instagramable wildflowers like in recent years past. 21 hours ago .

 

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | February 19, 2020

Anza-Borrego Wildflowers 2/19/20

Anza-Borrego Desert Natural History Association reportts

There is currently an early spring bloom taking place in many locations in Anza-Borrego.  Close to town the best place to go is Coyote Creek.  The flowers there are dominated by bright yellow desert dandelions but there are many other species in the mix, white chicory, orange desert sunflowers, and purple sand verbena.  There are flowers at the beginning of the dirt road but the best areas are about 1 1/2 mile in.  The road is in excellent shape right now and suitable for any vehicle (with care) to first crossing.  Beyond first crossing high clearance is essential and 4WD is recommended, but it is not necessary to go that far.

If you are looking for desert lilies there is a nice bloom taking place at the Arroyo Salado Campground.  Look for flowers along the road that leaves the campground to the east.  Desert lilies are also reported along the route to the Calcite Mine

See photos at Anza-Borrego Desert Wildflowers Update

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | February 19, 2020

Grizzly Bear Death Rates Are Climbing

The New York Times reports

Trains, cars and poaching have all contributed to a soaring number of fatalities, prompting fears for the grizzlies’ future.In 2018, a record number of grizzly bears — 51 — were killed in the Northern Continental Divide Ecosystem, millions of acres in and around Glacier National Park.
In 2018, a record number of grizzly bears — 51 — were killed in the Northern Continental Divide Ecosystem, millions of acres in and around Glacier National Park.

Read more at  Grizzly Bear Death Rates Are Climbing – The New York Times

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | February 18, 2020

Fresno Blossom Trail 2/18/20

Fresno County Office of Tourism – Blossom Trail reports on February 18, 2020

Pink Blossoms were spotted at Academy & Belmont on Sunday. Sunshine in the forecast over the next five days, predicts more orchards in bloom by the weekend.

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | February 18, 2020

Antelope Valley Wildflower Reports 2/14/20

Poppy Reserve/ Mojave Desert Interpretive Association has a new report for Feb. 14

The 2020 wildflower season has begun. The fiddleneck are up to 5 to 6 inches, pygmy-leaved lupine have their leaves, filaree have their true leaves and starting to flower, locoweed have their green leaves, grasses are up to 3 plus inches and yes there are poppy plants with their true leaves. I also observed the cotyledons of goldfields. The male Juniper trees are loaded with cones that are producing the pollen and the female trees have small berries.

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | February 18, 2020

Anza-Borrego Wildflower Updates 2/17/20

Anza-Borrego Wildflowers Guide reports

Easy to reach confirmed locations:

  • Glorietta Canyon and Yagui Meadows (washes/drainages just east of Glorietta Canyon) bloom normal.
  • Coyote Canyon half a mile past the asphalt up to first crossing, bloom normal.
  • Coachwhip / Ella Wash don’t expect flower carpets, but you will find interesting flowers.
  • Alma Wash a.k.a. Elephant Tree Natural Area is above normal, as are washes to the north, bloom above normal for the area.

The bloom in Henderson Canyon, close to normal.

See photos at https://borregowildflowers.org/pages/blooming.html

 

February 17, 2020: Anza-Borrego Desert State Park Wildflower Update

While we haven’t had enough rain to bring on a “superbloom” in the Park this year, there are a few areas where you can find a sprinkling of annual wildflowers. Desert Gold Poppies, Phacelia, and a variety of tiny “belly flowers” are starting to make their appearance near the Visitor Center and on low rocky hillsides. Little Surprise Canyon, the Yaqui Well Trail, and Cactus Loop Trail are worth exploring. Fishhook cacti are especially abundant (and in bloom!) along the Yaqui Well Trail.

Park at the end of the pavement at the north end of DiGiorgio Road and walk up the 4WD Coyote Canyon Road for a few lilies and a scattering of annuals. And a small pocket of wildflowers is blooming near the east end of Henderson Canyon, just west of the “PegLeg” area.

Check back in a week and see what has developed!
You can also call our Wildflower Hotline at 760-767-4684.

 

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | February 18, 2020

Regional Park Botanic Garden Photos 2/17/20

Photos taken in the Regional Park Botanic Garden Photos on 2/17/20.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | February 18, 2020

Job opportunity: Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden

From Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden
We have an entry level position open at Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden in Claremont, California
Seed Conservation Intern:  Assist the Director of Conservation Programs, Seeds of Success Coordinator, and the Seed Conservation Program Manager in execution of field research and seed collecting activities for Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden’s California Plant Rescue (CaPR) program, Seed LA, and the Bureau of Land Management’s (BLM) Seeds of Success Program (SOS).  CaPR is a collaborative project to secure the future of California’s native flora by collecting seeds of California native plant species for long term preservation in secure regional seed banks (ex-situ conservation), Seed LA is a regional effort to make locally appropriate regional native plant materials more broadly available in the greater Los Angeles region, and SOS is a program coordinated by the BLM to support seed collections from native plant populations to conserve and develop native plant materials for stabilizing, rehabilitating and restoring lands in the United States. Duties include assisting in the field to scout populations, collect seed, conduct surveys, collect and process plant specimens, plant identification, data collection, preparation of field forms and reports, data entry and labeling of field collections, seed processing, seed testing, and preparation of seeds for storage.
See full job description at  Seed Conservation Intern
Posted by: Sandy Steinman | February 17, 2020

Will there be a 2020 SLO County CA wildflower super bloom?

The San Luis Obispo Tribune has an article on

A lackluster winter rain season has left much of California on the cusp of a drought — so what does that mean for the state’s much-Instagrammed wildflowers?

The with local sources at Carrizo Plain National Monument, Anza-Borrego Desert State Park, Antelope Valley and Walker Canyon.

Read story at  Will there be a 2020 SLO County CA wildflower super bloom? | San Luis Obispo Tribune

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | February 17, 2020

Antelope Valley California Poppy Reserve 2/16/20

Antelope Valley California Poppy Reserve SNR reports

The first few poppies are in bloom near Kitanemuk Vista Point, on the south-facing side.  Fiddlenecks, slender keel fruits, red maids and forget-me-nots are also blooming in a few places on the reserve.

The ADA trail has been expanded and is now 0.7 mile long.  It winds around part of the Poppy Trail North Loop.  We look forward to having the Poppy Reserve more accessible for everyone.

Please remember, visitors must stay on OFFICIAL TRAILS only; photos in the flowers are not allowed in the park. Walking in the poppies creates dirt patches and may result in a ticket. DO NOT walk where others have already damaged the habitat; it will compound the damage and leave a scar for years to come.

Commercial and student filming/photography requires a permit. No dogs, bikes on trails, drones, or picking flowers.

Poppies open up in mid morning, and curl up in the late afternoon/evening or if it’s cold, so check the weather forecast before leaving.  The weather can change suddenly and it is frequently windy here during the spring.  This is a DESERT grassland, so drink water often.  Note that it can be very windy here in the spring.

Current Photos

Weekly bloom updates will be posted through Mother’s Day.

NEW THIS YEAR: Cell Phone Tour! Smartphone users can go to PoppyReserve.oncell.com and watch for notifications along the trails. Learn about the natural and cultural history of the reserve, with photos and audio stops.

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | February 17, 2020

Anza-Borrego Wildflowers 2/16/20

Anza-Borrego Wildflowers Guide  reports

Bloom is low/normal but there are many bright areas if you are willing to hike.

See photos for East of Coyote Mountain and Clark Dry

Anza Borrego Desert Wildflowers reports

Coyote Canyon:

Water in First, Second and Third crossing, at second crossing water is a bit deeper than usual.
Bloom is best between Zero and First Crossing.
A nice display of Malacothrix glabrata | Desert dandelion, mixed with some Phacelia distans | Common phacelia, the occasional Rafinesquia neomexicana | Desert chicory and small Abronia villosa villosa , Desert sand verbena.
The display is good but not spectacular, for this area it’s above average.

Lower Willows is still a problem, there isn’t a good route yet, maybe for this season.
Part of the route is a dense pack of arrow weed, others turned into a pond.
For now only for the very adventurous, with enough water in case you don’t find your way back.

Henderson Canyon Rd

This is one of the main flower tourist attractions.
Right now it’s green with non-native plants, by the thousands, covering the entire area.
Some Abronia villosa villosa | Desert sand verbena and Geraea canescens | Desert sunflower.

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | February 17, 2020

A New Phacelia Hidden in Plain Sight 

The California CNPS recently reported on the discovery of a new Phacelia species. It was found by two USFS botanists along a dirt road toward Damnation Pass, northwest of Redding.

The plant doesn’t have a name yet, but the team is leaning toward P. damnatio to commemorate the location of Damnation Pass

Read story at  A New Phacelia Hidden in Plain Sight – California Native Plant Society

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