Posted by: Sandy Steinman | October 22, 2021

Video on Enhancing Fall Color Photography 

A video on processing fall color photographs from Matt Kloskowski :3 WAYS TO BOOST FALL COLORS: learn some tricks for editing the color in those photos.

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | October 21, 2021

Job Openings: Botanist San Luis Obispo

Two botanist positions at TERRA VERDE ENVIRONMENTAL CONSULTING, LLC – San Luis Obispo, California

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | October 21, 2021

Victory for Alaskan Western Arctic Region

Center Biological Diversity News Release

Biden Administration Won’t Appeal Decision Shutting Down Western Arctic Oil Drilling Project

ANCHORAGE, Alaska— The Biden administration cemented a climate victory today by not appealing a federal district court decision halting ConocoPhillips’ Willow Master Development Plan. Willow would be the largest oil-and-gas drilling project in the Alaskan Arctic and would be located in a vast and biodiverse landscape in the Western Arctic.

Read More…

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | October 21, 2021

Job Openings: Communications Manager & Land Stewardship Manager

Eastern Sierra Land Trust Job Announcements:
We are hiring! Do you want to go to work to protect the Eastern Sierra? Apply to join our team as Communications Manager or Land Stewardship Manager. Please share with someone who might be interested! Visit ESLT.org/employment.
Posted by: Sandy Steinman | October 21, 2021

Fall Planting Guide

from Calflora
It’s time to plant your garden! To determine which native plants will grow well at a specific California location, use the Calflora Planting Guide.
Choose your location on the map or type your address, then select low water, riparian, or shady, and SEARCH.
You may also add more criteria such as check for wild plants in the same ecoregion, in the same county, and / or within ten miles.
Opt to use soil factors, omit plants at the edges of their tolerances, and / or select only species that are easy to establish.
Here is a short Planting Guide video.

 

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | October 20, 2021

Tioga Pass Closing Thursday 10/21

Yosemite National Park reports:
Tioga Road (the continuation of Highway 120 through the park) will temporarily close tomorrow (Thursday, October 21) at 6 pm. We will evaluate the road next week once weather improves.
US National Weather Service Hanford California is forecasting rain and snow from Friday through Tuesday, with heavy rain and snow expected starting late Sunday. The forecast calls for several feet of snow at Tioga Pass and several inches of rain at the lower elevations. You can check current road conditions in Yosemite by calling 209/372-0200 (then 1, 1).
Posted by: Sandy Steinman | October 20, 2021

Job Opportunity: Preserve Manager

Preserve Manager – San Diego County; Center for Natural Lands Management (CNLM

Position Description Link
Posted by: Sandy Steinman | October 20, 2021

Bird Chalk Art

See an impressive display of bird chalk art from the Berkeley Birding festival at the Golden Gate Birder blog 10/20/2021

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | October 20, 2021

The Orionid Meteor Shower peaks this week, but…

NPR reports

The Orionid Meteor Shower peaks this week, but astronomers say it may be a bust for viewing, because the bright moon is also full.

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | October 19, 2021

Bringing Back the Burrowing Owl 10/21/21

from Golden Gate Audubon
Bringing Back the Burrowing Owl  Thursday, October 21 via Zoom — 7 p.m.
Doug Bell and Shawn Smallwood
Once thriving in the East Bay, the Burrowing Owl has been forced to move inland and the consequences for many have been fatal. Conducting long-term research on these colonies, Shawn Smallwood and Doug Bell have observed the rate of mortality for Burrowing Owls living within the Altamont Pass Wind Resource Area, as wind turbines within the area continue to contribute to avian bird deaths. During this presentation they will speak on their findings and the management efforts being conducted on East Bay Regional Park District lands, including volunteer-based habitat restoration programs.
 
Posted by: Sandy Steinman | October 19, 2021

2022 Anza-Borrego Desert Photo Contest

from the Anza-Borrego Foundation

Submissions for online entries will start 11/07/2021 and run through 12/07/2021. The contest categories will be:
Plants of Anza-Borrego
People Enjoying the Park
Cell Phone Photos
Animals of Anza-Borrego
Black & White
Landscapes of Anza-Borrego
We even have a pretty awesome grand prize for the winner! Details will be posted on our website soon.
Posted by: Sandy Steinman | October 18, 2021

Changing Climates, Changing Landscapes 10/21/21

Science at Cal – Changing climates, changing landscapes: What does this mean for the future?

Lecture: Midday Science Cafe | October 21 | 12-1:30 p.m. |  Zoom

Open to audience: All Audiences

Registration required: Free   Register online

In this month’s Midday Science Cafe, we’ll speak to scientists who ask one of the most pressing questions in climate change: How does climate change alter landscapes and what are the downstream effects of these changes?

Learn more about event: Changing climates, changing landscapes: What does this mean for the future?

 

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | October 18, 2021

Understanding Wildfire and Its Impact in California

Understanding Wildfire and Its Impact in California — Despite its international leadership on limiting climate change, California is confronting a wildfire crisis. Getting ahead of this impending interlocked catastrophe requires a vision and strategy that will accelerate learning and rapidly transform new insights into effective practice. Featuring John Battles, professor of forest ecology. Register for the lecture on Friday, Oct. 22, at 10:30 a.m. PT. 

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | October 18, 2021

Birdability Week Events

Birdability Week 2021 Events

Tuesday, October 19, 2021 7:00 PM – 8:30 PM ET
Empowering Exploration: Birding With an Access Challenge

Join a panelist of birders—and potential future birders—with disabilities and other health concerns as we discuss their approach to adventure and exploration. What do you think about when planning a birding trip? How do you tackle obstacles, and what happens when something goes wrong? How can you frame your birding exploits to be a tool of empowerment, rather than seeing barriers at every turn? We hope you’ll come away with a new approach to birding! Register Here

Wednesday, October 20, 2021 4:00 PM – 5:30 PM ET
Accessibility For Me: What makes a birding location truly accessible?

A birding location opens a new boardwalk and describes it on their website as “accessible”… but when you arrive, you discover it really isn’t. Join Birdability Coordinator and occupational therapist Freya McGregor to discover what can make a birding location truly accessible, how to submit Birdability Site Reviews to the Birdability Map, and where to hold accessible and inclusive bird outings. We’ll hear from special guests explaining accessibility needs, and get ideas on trail design and upgrades you can advocate for in your community. Register Here

Thursday, October 21, 2021 7:00 PM – 8:30 PM ET
Panel: A Good IDEA for Birding

Join in for a conversation about inclusion, diversity, equity, and access (IDEA) in birding and the outdoors, and learn what you can do to be a more welcoming and inclusive birder for folks who are BIPOC, LGBTQIA+, who have a disability or other health concern, and who share intersecting identities. Come away with more understanding and appreciation for your fellow birder, and strategies you can start implementing immediately for yourself and any groups or organizations you’re a part of to help ensure birding truly is for everybody! Register Here

For more information about Birdability and how you can help make the outdoors a welcoming place for everybody, visit Birdability.org.

Celebrate Birdability Week!
Posted by: Sandy Steinman | October 17, 2021

Critical Migratory Bird Protections Reinstated

Audubon News Release

Longstanding Migratory Bird Treaty Act protections will be reinstated and a key process to strengthen the rules now begins.

Biden-Harris administration,” said Dr. Elizabeth Gray, president and acting CEO, National Audubon Society. “Reinstating these protections will restore decades of bipartisan precedent. The newly announced plans to strengthen the century-old law are a welcome and necessary step to address the loss of three billion birds in North America.”

Read More…

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | October 17, 2021

Anza-Borrego Desert Natural History Association Activities & Events

In the interest of maintaining a healthy environment for everyone participating in our in-person activities, including hikes and tours, proof of full COVID vaccination is required; either the original CDC vaccination card, a photo on your phone, or a printed paper copy of the card will suffice.
Read More…
Posted by: Sandy Steinman | October 17, 2021

Lassen Park Is Opened on a Limited Basis

Due to impacts from the Dixie Fire, access and areas that are open are limited. Though few, open hiking trails are diverse. Lakes, creeks, meadows, forest, and alpine vistas are calling. The popular Bumpass Hell Trail is closed, but it’s smaller, yet interesting relative, Sulphur Works is waiting for you. At the roadside, Sulphur Works is one mile inside the southwest park entrance.
Knowledge is power! Prepare for your visit by knowing what is and what is not open – https://www.nps.gov/lavo/planyourvisit/conditions.htm
Posted by: Sandy Steinman | October 17, 2021

Pt. Reyes Photos 10/16/21

A few photos from a walk around Pt. Reyes.

Also a photo showing how the Nicasio Reservoir is almost empty. The lower two thirds of the photo are usually covered with water.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | October 17, 2021

 A Weird World Of Animal ‘Crimes’ 

NPR  reports on ‘Animal Crimes

Animals living among us often ignore the rules we try to impose on them. Science writer Mary Roach experienced this firsthand when a group of macaque monkeys accosted her in India.

Read more at  Mary Roach’s ‘Fuzz’ Reveals A Weird World Of Animal ‘Crimes’ : Shots – Health News : NPR

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | October 16, 2021

Botanical Riches of Tejon Ranch 10/19/21

from California Native Plants Society Channel Islands Chapter

Botanical Riches of Tejon Ranch w/ Scot Pipkin, Director of Education and Engagement at Santa Barbara Botanic Garden Tuesday, October 19th, 2021 at 7:00PM 

Located in one of California’s richest ecological crossroads and spanning over 250,000 acres, Tejon Ranch is one of the most superlative properties in the state. Join Scot Pipkin for an overview of the botanical riches of Tejon Ranch and surrounding landscapes, spanning the San Joaquin Valley, valley and blue oak woodlands, southern Sierra Nevada coniferous forest, and western Mojave Desert. Scot will draw on his experiences as the Tejon Ranch Conservancy Public Access Manager from 2012-2016, when he spent most days exploring the property, discovering its biological riches, and sharing with others.
Meeting ID: 852 2057 1827
Passcode: 816412
Find your local number: https://cnps-org.zoom.us/u/kcRhgLXjdE
Posted by: Sandy Steinman | October 16, 2021

Most of Kings Canyon National Park Opening 10/18

The majority of Kings Canyon National Park will reopen to the public on Monday, October 18! The areas that are opening did not see active fire, and are no longer considered to be under threat.
For more information see News Release

 

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | October 16, 2021

Birdability Week 2021 Events 10/19 to 10/21

Birdability Week 2021 Events

Tuesday, October 19, 2021 7:00 PM – 8:30 PM ET
Empowering Exploration: Birding With an Access Challenge

Join a panelist of birders—and potential future birders—with disabilities and other health concerns as we discuss their approach to adventure and exploration. What do you think about when planning a birding trip? How do you tackle obstacles, and what happens when something goes wrong? How can you frame your birding exploits to be a tool of empowerment, rather than seeing barriers at every turn? We hope you’ll come away with a new approach to birding! Register Here

Wednesday, October 20, 2021 4:00 PM – 5:30 PM ET
Accessibility For Me: What makes a birding location truly accessible?

A birding location opens a new boardwalk and describes it on their website as “accessible”… but when you arrive, you discover it really isn’t. Join Birdability Coordinator and occupational therapist Freya McGregor to discover what can make a birding location truly accessible, how to submit Birdability Site Reviews to the Birdability Map, and where to hold accessible and inclusive bird outings. We’ll hear from special guests explaining accessibility needs, and get ideas on trail design and upgrades you can advocate for in your community. Register Here

Thursday, October 21, 2021 7:00 PM – 8:30 PM ET
Panel: A Good IDEA for Birding

Join in for a conversation about inclusion, diversity, equity, and access (IDEA) in birding and the outdoors, and learn what you can do to be a more welcoming and inclusive birder for folks who are BIPOC, LGBTQIA+, who have a disability or other health concern, and who share intersecting identities. Come away with more understanding and appreciation for your fellow birder, and strategies you can start implementing immediately for yourself and any groups or organizations you’re a part of to help ensure birding truly is for everybody! Register Here

For more information about Birdability and how you can help make the outdoors a welcoming place for everybody, visit Birdability.org.

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | October 16, 2021

California Protects Leatherback Sea Turtles as Endangered

from Center for Biological Diversity

Decision Comes in Time for Pacific Leatherback Sea Turtle Conservation Day

SACRAMENTO, Calif.— The California Fish and Game Commission voted today to protect leatherback sea turtles as endangered under the state’s Endangered Species Act. The commission acted on the recommendation of the California Department of Fish and Wildlife, which is concerned by the turtles’ dramatic decline in state waters.

Read More…

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | October 15, 2021

See The Top 2021 Wildlife Photographer of the Year Winners 

NPR  reports on the winning images of the 2021 Wildlife Photographer of the Year competition a

The annual competition is organized by London’s Natural History Museum and is recognized as the world’s longest-running and most prestigious nature photography competition. In announcing the winners on Tuesday, the museum said it had received more than 50,000 submissions from 95 countries.

See photos and read more at  Wildlife Photographer of the Year winners announced for 2021 : The Picture Show : NPR

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | October 15, 2021

BigPicture: Natural World Photography exhibit

from the Academy of Sciences

Opening on Saturday, October 16, and on view through April 24, 2022, the eighth annual BigPicture: Natural World Photography exhibit spotlights 49 of the year’s most striking nature, wildlife and conservation images, from nearly 8,400 photos submitted by photographers around the world. The exhibit highlights Earth’s biodiversity, illustrates the many threats that our planet faces, and underscores the importance of protecting, conserving, and regenerating the natural world. View the winning images online, and dive deeper into the stories behind each photograph at bioGraphic.

from the Xerces Society

One of the most valuable things you can do to support pollinators and other invertebrates is to provide them with the winter cover they need. Leave the leaves does not mean ignoring them and leaving them where they fell. You can move them to places in your yard where they are out of the way, will not kill your turf, and will still help wildlife. A thin layer of leaves can actually help turf—but too much will kill the grass. Consider raking leaves into areas around trees, or use them as winter mulch for perennials or to cover garden beds.
Read more at: Leaves are not litter. They are food and shelter for butterflies, moths, beetles, and more

Beyond Plants: What Else do Insects Need to Thrive (pre-recorded webinar)
A garden that has an abundance of flowers will support insects—but to maximize the diversity of insects your garden can support, you’ll also need to provide places where they can nest, lay eggs, and shelter. In this recorded presentation, Xerces’ Matthew Shepherd and Jennifer Hopwood talk about how to leave the leaves, save the stems, and other ways to help insects thrive in your backyard. Watch on our YouTube Channel
Posted by: Sandy Steinman | October 13, 2021

Sneaky Thieves Steal Hair From Foxes, Raccoons, Dogs, Even You 

The New York Times reports

It’s simple: Mammals have hair or fur. Birds want it.

Hair from dogs, raccoons and even humans has been found in the nests of birds, which scientists believe makes the nests better insulated. For a long time, scientists assumed that birds had to collect hair that had been shed or scavenge it from mammal carcasses. However, a new study, published last week in the journal Ecology, shows that several species of bird, including chickadees and titmice, don’t just scavenge hair, they steal it.

See videos and read more at Sneaky Thieves Steal Hair From Foxes, Raccoons, Dogs, Even You

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | October 12, 2021

What Insect Has The Longest Dormancy?

It is the Yucca Moth, which can have a dormancy period of up to 30 years. See research article:  Longest Insect Dormancy: Yucca Moth Larvae (Lepidoptera: Prodoxidae) Metamorphose After 20, 25, and 30 Years in Diapause

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | October 11, 2021

Groundbreaking legal win for Joshua trees 

WildEarth Guardians reports

I’m thrilled to announce that we have scored a monumental legal victory for the Joshua tree, as well as climate-imperiled species across the country.

A federal judge—a George W. Bush appointee no less—recently ruled that the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service violated the law when it failed to list the imperiled Joshua tree under the Endangered Species Act.

Read more at Groundbreaking legal win for Joshua trees – WildEarth Guardians

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | October 11, 2021

A Plant That ‘Cannot Die’ Reveals Its Genetic Secrets

The New York Times reports on a very long-lived desert plant.

Events in the genome of Welwitschia have given it the ability to survive in an unforgiving desert for thousands of years.

The longest-lived leaves in the plant kingdom can be found only in the harsh, hyperarid desert that crosses the boundary between southern Angola and northern Namibia.

A desert is not, of course, the most hospitable place for living things to grow anything, let alone leafy greens, but the Namib Desert — the world’s oldest with parts receiving less than two inches of precipitation a year — is where Welwitschia calls home.

Read more at A Plant That ‘Cannot Die’ Reveals Its Genetic Secrets-The New York Times

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