Posted by: Sandy Steinman | February 21, 2019

Wildflower Viewing Behavior

Picking wildflowers is often illegal. Removing or tramping on them interferes with pollination and reduces their numbers. Transplanting blooming wildflowers is rarely successful.

Please do not trespass on private property to view wildflowers. If you are viewing wildflowers that are on private property please view only from neighboring public areas and respect all signs on accessibility.

National Forest Service on Wildflower Ethics and Native Plants Ethics and Native Plants

Tips and park rules provided by California State Parks designed to make viewing the wildflower blooms more enjoyable:

Respect the Landscapes

• Each park has unique landscapes. Stay on designated trails whenever possible. Tread lightly in the desert. Do not trample flowers.

• When viewing the blooms, take only pictures. Flower picking is prohibited.

Read More…

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | April 20, 2019

10 Ways to Celebrate Earth Month

The Sierra Club  writes about was to celebrate Earth Day (April 22)  and Earth Month at  10 Ways to Celebrate Earth Month | Sierra Club

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | April 20, 2019

Winters Becoming Shorter in Mountainous Western U.S.

Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UC San Diego reports

Winters are still coming, but they’re becoming increasingly shorter, say the findings of one researcher at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego.

Looking at snowpack data from 1982 through 2017, researcher Amato Evan found that winters are becoming shorter in mountainous regions. While he found no trend in declining snowfall, his research shows that the snow is disappearing earlier in the year, which could have implications for state water management and wildfire activity. The study was published December 12, 2018 in the Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology and presented at the American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting in Washington, D.C.

Read full article at  Winters Becoming Shorter in Mountainous Western U.S. | Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UC San Diego

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | April 19, 2019

Southern California Wildflower Reports 4/19/19

Theodore Payne has new wildflower report today for Central and Southern California. You can find it and older reports at Theodore Payne Wildflower Hotline

The Hotline is meant to help people enjoy the unique and beautiful nature of Southern California, without diminishing that resource in years to come. We encourage people to treat these floral treasures with the respect due to all living organisms.

Flower viewing etiquette is simple:

  • Stay on the paths
  • Stand on bare ground
  • Leave the flowers unharmed

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | April 19, 2019

Golden Gate Park is the Most Valuable Green Space in the World

A recent study, published in the London Evening Standard last week, compared 12 iconic urban parks in the world in terms of the value of the real estate they occupy.  The results:   Golden Gate Park in San Francisco is the most expensive urban green space in the world.   It is worth more than $49 billion.  The study calculated values by multiplying the size of the park by the average apartment value per sq/m in the city.  Central Park in New York, which is smaller than Golden Gate Park, is worth more than $45 billion based on New York property prices.

Obviously the cultural capital enjoyed by these parks outweighs their monetary value.  Let’s hope that doesn’t change!

ScienceDaily reports

The growth of forest trees all over the world is becoming more water-limited as the climate warms. The effect is most evident in northern climates and at high altitudes where the primary limitation on tree growth had been cold temperatures. The research details the first time that changes in tree growth in response to current climate changes have been mapped at a near-global scale.

Read story at  Water, not temperature, limits global forest growth as climate warms — ScienceDaily

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | April 17, 2019

Why we need birds (far more than they need us) 

Birdlife.org report on why birds are essential part of the world’s ecosystems

The benefits birds bring us aren’t just cultural. Birds play an essential role in the functioning of the world’s ecosystems, in a way that directly impacts human health, economy and food production – as well as millions of other species. Here’s how…

Read  how birds benefit ecosystems and humans at   Why we need birds (far more than they need us) | BirdLife

The New York Times reports on how One of Nature’s Smallest Flowering Plants Can Survive Inside of a Duck

If one duckweed lands where a bird relieves itself, it’s capable of eventually creating a dense mat of duckweeds where there were none before.

Read story at One of Nature’s Smallest Flowering Plants Can Survive Inside of a Duck – The New York Times

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | April 15, 2019

Anza-Borrego State Park Wildflowers 4/14/19

Anza Borrego State Park reports on April 14, 2019

With almost 8 inches of rain since July, we have experienced a widespread bloom of flowers. Click the link below for specific tips and locations.

Although the show of annual wildflowers is mostly over, shrubs and cacti are still blooming at the Visitor Center and in western canyons such as Borrego Palm Canyon, Hellhole Canyon, and Henderson Canyon.  The Highway 78 corridor also has plenty of minor canyons worth exploring, in addition to Plum Canyon (2WD vehicles should stay to the right when the dirt road forks). Palo Verde trees are starting to bloom with abundant yellow flowers. Ocotillo are looking great in many locations!

AREA MAP WITH WILDFLOWER VIEWING TIPS 4/13/19

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | April 15, 2019

Chimney Rock Wildflowers 4/14/19

The Marin CNPS chapter has a post with eight photos showing what is currently in bloom at Chimney Rock at Pt. Reyes National Seashore at Marin Native Plants

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | April 15, 2019

Regional Parks Botanic Garden Native Plant Sale April 20

Regional Parks Botanic Garden Spring Sale of California Native Plants

Saturday, April 20, 2019  10 a.m. – 3 p.m.

Choose from a huge selection of California native shrubs, trees, and perennials at our annual spring sale to benefit the Garden.
See our website www.nativeplants.org for more information and a complete list of plants that will be available at the sale along with their quantity, pot size, and price. The plant list will be posted soon and will be updated up to the day before the sale.9:00 a.m. to 10: 00 a.m. Friends of the Regional Parks Botanic Garden only
(Memberships can be purchased at the door starting at 8:30 a.m. on April 20.)10: a.m. to 3:00 p.m. Open to the public

Sale held at Regional Parks Botanic Garden, Tilden Regional Park.

  • Entrance to the sale will be at the Garden’s west gate on Anza View Drive via Wildcat Canyon Road.
  • Free parking and no entrance fee
  • Cash, check, and credit card payments are welcome.
  • Bring your own small wagon or boxes.
  • Plenty of fun and expert advice, rain or shine!
Coyote Brush Studios will be selling their handmade, sustainable, educational goods and prints celebrating California’s unique biodiversity and natural history.
Posted by: Sandy Steinman | April 15, 2019

How Plants Sense Temperature

ScienceDaily Reports

Scientists identify how plants sense temperature: With a temperature sensor in hand, researchers can engineer crops that produce yields in warmer climates

A UC Riverside researcher is leading a team exploring how plants respond to temperature.

Read story at Scientists identify how plants sense temperature: With a temperature sensor in hand, researchers can engineer crops that produce yields in warmer climates — ScienceDaily

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | April 14, 2019

Mt. Burdell Wildflowers

The  Marin CNPS has a posting of photos from a recent trip to  Mt. Burdell at (1) California Native Plant Society

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | April 14, 2019

Antelope Valley Wildflowers 4/13/19

Antelope Valley California Poppy Reserve Bloom update as of April 13, 2019:

As of April 13th, the blooming poppies are still blanketing the reserve with their magnificent orange color.  Every flower and other plants that exist at the Poppy Reserve are currently blooming.  This is a great time to visit.  We are expecting the bloom to last through April, but the peak of the bloom has been reached.  The bloom continue to be amazing, a few flowers have started to wilt while there are still some plants that have buds.  If you are looking to find the exact location of a particular flower or plant, our staff can point you to the right trails when you arrive.

Please remember, visitors must stay on OFFICIAL TRAILS only; photos in the flowers are not allowed in the park. Walking in the poppies creates dirt patches and may result in a ticket. DO NOT walk where others have already damaged the habitat; it will compound the damage and leave a scar for years to come.

Commercial and student filming/photography requires a permit. No dogs, bikes on trails, drones, or picking flowers.

Poppies open up in mid morning, and curl up in the late afternoon/evening or if it’s cold, so check the weather forecast before leaving.  The weather can change suddenly and it is frequently windy here during the spring.  This is a DESERT grassland, so drink water often.  Note that it can be very windy here in the spring.

Current Photos

 

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | April 14, 2019

Texas Wildflowers: Ennis County 4/14/19

Texas Wildflower Report has an update on Ennis Country

Today, Sunday, April 14th, 2019 is the last day of the Ennis Bluebonnet Festival, but the marked trails will be available to tour and view through April 30th

See photos and older reports at Texas Wildflower Report

 
 
 

 

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | April 14, 2019

America’s reindeer have quietly gone extinct in the Lower 48

HeadTopics reports

America’s reindeer have quietly gone extinct in the Lower 48.

The last known member of the only herd to roam between Canada and the Pacific Northwest was captured and relocated earlier this year.

Read full story at  Selkirk Caribou | America’s reindeer have quietly gone extinct in the Lower 48

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | April 13, 2019

San Diego Wildflower Hikes

Pacific San Diego reports on four wildflower hiking trails in San Diego County. Only one is in Anza-Borrego. The others are

  • Torrey Pines State Natural Reserve
  • Los Peñasquitos Canyon Preserve
  • Lake Hodges

Read article at San Diego hikes to see spring flowers – Pacific San Diego

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | April 13, 2019

Anza-Borrego Wildflowers Past Peak 4/11/19

Borrego Wildflowers reports

Bloom prediction for the Anza-Borrego Desert:

When will the low desert bloom peak? It peaked by the end of March and we are now way peak bloom.
Bloom is still good to very good above 2000 feet.
The best bloom is between Cottonwood Canyon and Potrero.

Check out Tom Chester bloom report

Additional info:
Anza-Borrego Desert Facebook
Anza-Borrego Desert SP Bloom page
ABDNHA Bloom page

April/11/2019 Cottonwood Canyon Salt Creek loop

A couple of days ago overlooking Cottonwood Canyon, there was a faint orange glow, like Eschscholzia californica | California poppy. Read More…

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | April 13, 2019

Carrizo Plain Wildflower Update 4/11/19

Friends of the Carrizo Plain reports

Flowers are still good here at Carrizo Plain, but just past peak and starting to fade. We are starting to see later blooming species and now is the time to come out before flowers are done for the season. Best viewing locations are:
-Soda Lake Road just south of the Visitor Center (Hillside Daisies, Valley Phacillia, Owl’s Clover)
-Near Traver Ranch (Phachillia, Hillside Daisies)
-Simmler Road (Coriposis/Tickseed, Tidy Tips, Hillside Daises, Lemon’s Mustard), -Temblor Mountain Range (Hillside daises, Phacilla, and Desert Candle)
*High clearance vehicles recommended for Elkhorn Road and access to the Temblors. Much of the northern Temblors is private property.

Please respect private property within and around Carrizo Plain, even if there are flowers. Rattlesnakes are also starting to be seen at Carrizo. Make sure to bring a full tank of gas, food, water, and everything else you need for the day. Campgrounds having been filling up even on weekdays, so make alternative plans. Visitors cannot camp on the valley floor, which is sensitive endanger species habitat.

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | April 13, 2019

Bear Valley and Table Mt. Wildflower Photos & Notes

Kathi Dowdakin contributed these photos and updates from her recent visits  Bear Valley and Table Mt.
Bear Valley is too deep in grass for a good show this year.  The roads are fine, with only a couple of wet spots.  I was surprised at that.  The Leesville Rd heading east towards Williams has been paved since the last time we were out that way, which made for a very nice ride to Colusa.  Couldn’t get around the Buttes to the north, as everything was flooded on the west side.
North Table Mt. is another area that’s blooming wildly this year, with way too many inconsiderate flower-trampling people & dogs.  Gorgeous flower vistas, revolting behaviors.  CNPS needs to post several hundred signs saying “If you love the flowers, don’t trample them!”  Yeesh.

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Posted by: Sandy Steinman | April 13, 2019

Henry Coe Wildflower Update 4/13/19

Henry Coe State Park has a new wildflower bloom report  for April 13, 2019 at the Pine Ridge Association website with photos and a list of flowers now in bloom at: Henry W. Coe – Wildflower Guide.

New Website Link: Henry Coe has updated its website and changed the wildflower link. The new link is https://coepark.net/blooming 

 

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | April 13, 2019

Why Are We Still Slaughtering the American Bison?

The New York Times has an opinion piece  on “Why Are We Still Slaughtering the American Bison?”

Restoring herds to Native American land after 150 years would be a simple reparation for the country to make. But the cattle industry won’t allow it.

Read article at Why Are We Still Slaughtering the American Bison?

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | April 12, 2019

Southern California Wildflower Reports 4/12/19

Theodore Payne posted its newest wildflower report. 

The Hotline is meant to help people enjoy the unique and beautiful nature of Southern California, without diminishing that resource in years to come. We encourage people to treat these floral treasures with the respect due to all living organisms.

Flower viewing etiquette is simple:

  • Stay on the paths
  • Stand on bare ground
  • Leave the flowers unharmed

This week’s update includes the following locations:
See report and photos at April 12,2019

  • Prisk Native Garden
  • Carrizo Plain National Monument
  • Antelope Valley California Poppy Preserve
  • Los Angeles County Department of Parks & Recreation
    • Devil’s Punchbowl
    • Alpine Butter Wildlife Sanctuary
    • Jackrabbit Flat Wildlife Sanctuary
    • George R. Bones Wildlife Sanctuary 
    • Phacelia Wildlife Sanctuary
  • Descanso Gardens
  • Saddleback Butte State Park
  • Hungry Valley
  • Pinnacle National Monument
  • Diamond Valley Lake
  • Harford Springs Reserve
  • Anza-Borrego Desert State Park
  • Red Rock Canyon State Park
  • Figueroa Mountain in the Los Padres National Forest
  • Placerita Canyon Nature Center
  • Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden
  • Environmental Nature Center
  • Elizabeth Learning Center
  • Theodore Payne Foundation in Sun Valley

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | April 12, 2019

Homestead Valley Land Trust Wildflowers 4/11/19

Homestead Valley has a new wildflower update. See photos Homestead Valley April 11

NEW
– Crimson columbine with its bright red and yellow flowers is blooming below the trail near 11a.
– Pacific pea, one of our native pea vines, blooms with delicate blush flowers in forests.
– Redstem filaree*, native of Eurasia, is blooming with its pretty pink flowers in full sun.
– Spotted coralroot, our most common orchid, blooms white throated on a red stem under oaks, sometimes in great profusion.

 

Forests
– California nutmeg, this conifer’s male pollen cones are blooming white.
– Coast live oak, another of our common trees, blooms with tassel flowers.
– Douglas iris is blooming white in the forests.
– Fairy bells’ cream flowers bloom under their ladder of leaves so you have to look under to see the bells.
– False lily of the valley is carpeting the forest with its white star flowers.
– Forget-me-not*, native of Europe, is one of the most invasive plants of the Homestead forest. Its seeds form small burrs that animals spread deep into wild areas. Please, pull forget-me-nots wherever you see them; if they have seeds, please carry out and dispose.
– Giant trillium is taller with larger leaves than the more common Pacific trillium, has vertical cream or purple flowers and is blooming beyond in the forest.
– Milkmaid’s white flowers are blooming throughout the forest.
– Pacific bleeding heart with its heart-shaped pink flowers and delicate foliage is blooming under the redwood trees next to 435 Laverne.
– Pacific sanicle’s dark, glossy, lobed leaves line the forest trails and their tall flower spikes are blooming now with mustard clusters.
– Poison oak blooms with small white star flowers. One of the most common plants in the forest understory, its oil causes itchy allergic reactions in many people.
– Redwood sorrel has a bream bell flower and is blooming under the redwood near 435 Laverne.
– Trilium, white bloom floating on three large heart-shaped leaves is almost finished but can still be found blooming in the forests.
– Wood rose, our native rose, is starting to bloom in the woods.
– Wood sweet-cicely, found throughout the forests of Homestead blooms with small white flowers.

Forest edges
– American vetch, one of our native pea vines is blooming purple.
– California blackberry, is blooming white up on the ridge.
– Calla lily*, native to Southern Africa, has naturalized into wet seeps and is blooming white.
– Cape ivy, native of South Africa, is a noxious weed in California. It blankets shrubs, trees and ground, suppressing any other growth, is toxic to animals that eat it and to fish if it trails in the water.
– Chickweed*, native to Europe, a low weed with white flowers is a traditional edible and medicinal plant.
– Cowparsnip with its large white umbels is blooming at the forest edge.
– Fringe cups blooms in forests along streams on tall stalks with pale green flowers with distinctive fringe edges.
– Latin American fleabane*, native of Central America, has colonized a small area below Amaranth.
– Manroot, the wild cucumber vine is blooming white.
– Milkflower cotoneaster*, native to China, is blooming with white clusters on the ridge.
– Miner’s lettuce with its white flowers at the center of an edible circular leaf is blooming in wet seeps.
– Pacific hound’s tongue’s tall blue flowers are blooming at the forest edge.
– Sourgrass*, native to South Africa, is a noxious weed here. Bright yellow flower, sour stem sucking.
– White flowered onion*, native of the Mediterranean basin, is blooming in wet areas – edible.
– Woodland strawberry is blooming white up on the ridge below Homestead Hill.

Meadows
– Barberry, this small, spiky-leaved shrub is blooming with scented yellow flowers.
– Blue dicks is blooming with purple clusters in meadows.
– Blue eyed grass is blooming with glossy purple flowers in meadows.
– California buttercup, bright yellow and glossy is blooming in meadows.
– California goldfields blooms in colonies, carpeting meadows brilliant yellow.
– California plantain’s blooms with minute translucent petals.
– California poppy, orange and bright, it’s starting to bloom now and will continue late into the summer.
– Checkerbloom is blooming pink up on the ridge.
– Checker lily’s yellow-spotted chocolate bell is blooming on the Ridgewood Rock with budding sprouts waiting nearby.
– Death camus, a white star lily is starting to bloom in meadows.
– English plantain*, native of Eurasia, tall stalk is blooming with a white corolla.
– Field madder*, native of the Mediterranean, is blooming in meadows with little pink star flowers.
– Footsteps of spring’s chartreuse clusters brighten the ground up on the ridge.
– Greene’s saxifrage with its small white flower is still blooming on the Ridgewood Rock.
– Ground iris is blooming purple in meadows and forests.
– Indian warrior’s tall burgundy spikes are blooming all up and down the hillside under the oaks at 15 on the Homestead trail.
– Mule’s ear with its bright yellow sunflowers is blooming in the ridge meadow.
– Oakland star tulip is blooming with its whiteish, mariposa lily-shaped flower in meadows and on the Homestead Trail.
– Owl’s clover’s pink tufts have yellow and white details and is blooming on the knoll near the Panoramic gate.
– Poison hemlock*, native of Europe has a delicate white umbel and mottled red stems. Poisonous, use gloves when weeding.
– Purple sanicle with purple puff flowers is blooming in meadows.
– Red elderberry large shrub blooms with white clusters on the trail to Homestead Hill.
– Rosy sandcrocus*, native of South Africa, has a lovely pink flower and grows in meadows.
– Shooting star with its distinctive pink flower is blooming on the Ridgewood Rock and below the trail junction sign at 9.
– Silver lupine blooms purple on large silver leaved bushes up on the ridge.
– Spring gold, a bright yellow ground hugging lomatium is blooming on the Ridgewood Rock.
– Sticky monkeyflower with its orange flower blooms in sunny spots and will bloom all summer.
– Suncups, bright yellow and ground hugging is blooming in meadows.
– Winter cress with its small yellow flowers is blooming below Homestead Hill.
– Woodland star’s dainty white flowers are blooming at the bottom of the Ridgewood Rock.
– Wooly lomatium is blooming with its champagne froth clusters near its bright yellow cousin, spring gold, on the Ridgewood Rock.

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | April 12, 2019

Coastal Marin Wildflowers 4/11/19

The Marin CNPS Facebook page has photos from

Some plants seen on a recent Marin trip to Tomales and back down Hwy 1 past the coastal bluffs.

See photos at  (9) Marin Native Plants

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | April 12, 2019

While Visits To Public Lands Soar, Funds To Maintain Shrink

NPR reports

Across the western U.S., towns surrounded by public lands are facing an increasing bind: They’re seeing a huge surge in visitors coming to play in the forests and mountains surrounding them, which is leading to an economic boom. But, at the same time, federal funding to manage these lands has been drying up.

A recent analysis by the group showed that visitation to U.S. Forest Service and Bureau of Land Management land has risen by about 15 percent over the last decade, while budgets for programs that support recreation in those agencies has fallen by a similar amount.

Read how local organizations are compensating for the federal government shortfall at  While Visits To Public Lands Soar, Funds To Maintain Shrink : NPR

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | April 11, 2019

Eastern Sierra Road Clearing Updates

Mono County Tourism reports

The road to Lundy Lake is plowed to the resort!

📍Rock Creek Road is plowed to the snow park. Mono County road crews hope to have to road open to the lake by the fishing opener on April 27th.
📍Virginia Lakes Road is currently being plowed but is still closed at the top of Conway Summit.

Full Mono County road report at MonoCounty.ca.gov/roads/page/county-road-closures

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | April 11, 2019

Henry Coe Wildflower Update 4/11/19

Henry Coe State Park has a new wildflower bloom report  for April 9, 2019 at the Pine Ridge Association website with photos and a list of flowers now in bloom at: Henry W. Coe – Wildflower Guide.

New Website Link: Henry Coe has updated its website and changed the wildflower link. The new link is https://coepark.net/blooming 

 

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | April 11, 2019

Mono Basin Bird Chautauqua Registration Starts April 15

The Mono Basin Bird Chautauqua is June 14-16, 2019 in Lee Vining, CA

The Mono Basin Bird Chautauqua brings birders together to enhance appreciation and understanding of the Mono Basin’s diverse and abundant bird life and to educate the public about this area’s value to birds and people. The Chautauqua offers over 90 field trips, workshops, and presentations with renowned bird guides, naturalists, and artists. Add live music and delicious food, and you’ve got yourself a fantastic long weekend in nature with friends!

The Mono Basin Bird Chautauqua won a Mindful Birding Award in 2015 for adopting ethical birding guidelines and supporting conservation efforts for birds and their habitats. We’re proud to practice ethical birding.

Registration is on April 15 at 6:30am

The Mono Basin Bird Chautauqua is a very popular event. Many field trips will fill to capacity within minutes of registration opening. We suggest being as prepared as possible with trip choices as well as multiple alternative choices from the program. Register on our secure site for the events you wish to participate in along with your complete contact and payment information. You will be registered for the events of your choice based on availability. Registering online is faster, easier, and quickly confirms your spots.

Please fully prepare yourself to register by reading our REGISTRATION PAGE before registration opens!

The full schedule of field trips, presentations, and workshops is now online, including the grid schedule, which shows how trips may overlap. Please note that this schedule is still a draft and additional programs may be added prior to registration day.

For more information about go to the Mono Basin Chautauqua

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | April 10, 2019

The Comeback of Trumpeter Swans

The New York Times  reports

Restoration efforts in Ontario, Canada, have helped a once-vanquished population to flourish. And they have been sighted in new habitats in the United States, too.

Read story at The Comeback of Trumpeter Swans – The New York Times

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | April 10, 2019

Is the EPA Helping to Poison Bees? | Sierra Club

The Sierra Club  reports

The EPA has been allowing growers to spray pesticides that are toxic to honeybees and other pollinators using a loophole that bypasses standard environmental review and public comment, according to a report by the Center for Biological Diversity (CBD), an environmental legal advocacy group.

Read more at  Is the EPA Helping to Poison Bees? | Sierra Club

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