Posted by: Sandy Steinman | February 21, 2019

Wildflower Viewing Behavior

Picking wildflowers is often illegal. Removing or tramping on them interferes with pollination and reduces their numbers. Transplanting blooming wildflowers is rarely successful.

Please do not trespass on private property to view wildflowers. If you are viewing wildflowers that are on private property please view only from neighboring public areas and respect all signs on accessibility.

National Forest Service on Wildflower Ethics and Native Plants Ethics and Native Plants

Tips and park rules provided by California State Parks designed to make viewing the wildflower blooms more enjoyable:

Respect the Landscapes

• Each park has unique landscapes. Stay on designated trails whenever possible. Tread lightly in the desert. Do not trample flowers.

• When viewing the blooms, take only pictures. Flower picking is prohibited.

Read More…

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | June 15, 2019

Mt. Rainier Wildflowers 6/14/19

Mt. Rainier National Park reports

Currently Blooming

Avalanche lilies (Erythronium montanum) are an early-season wildflower. Their flowers have white petals with yellow at the center, distinguishing them from the entirely-yellow flowers of glacier lilies. Avalanche lilies are currently blooming along Stevens Canyon Road near Reflection Lakes, but they are common in many subalpine areas in the park. Watch the Mountain Moment: Avalanche Lilies video for a preview of these wildflowers.

Please Note: As snow melts away, it may be tempting to skirt remaining patches of snow that are covering trails. However, by going off trail you are walking on and damaging the wildflowers that you may be coming to see! It is better to stay on trail even if that means crossing snow, particularly in the high-visitation meadows around Paradise and Sunrise.

Wildflower Reports

  • Stevens Canyon Road, east to west (6/14) – wild strawberry, paintbrush, vanilla leaf, columbine, three-leaved anemone, lupine, goat’s beard, bear grass, Oregon sunshine, thimbleberry, penstemon, yarrow, subalpine daisy, avalanche lily, sitka valerian, sitka mountain ash, tall bluebells, phlox, Jeffrey’s shooting stars
  • Longmire-Paradise Road (6/13) – lupine, Jeffrey’s shooting star, bear grass, penstemon, paintbrush, sitka mountain ash
  • White River Road (6/14) – wild strawberry, vanilla leaf
  • Wonderland Trail Cougar Rock to Carter Falls (6/12) -vanilla leaf, stream violets, trillium (fading to pink), Calypso orchids, penstemon, avalanche lily
  • Nisqually Entrance to Longmire (6/6) – vanilla leaf, cow parsnip (early), three-leaved anemone, Piper’s anemone, big-leaved avens, bunchberry, columbine, tall bluebells, lupine
  • Longmire (6/6) – yellow violets, wild strawberry, Cascade oregongrape, heartleaf twayblade, mitrewort, salmonberry, slender bog orchid, bunchberry, three-leaved anemone, bear grass, alumroot, starflower, foam flower (early)

Wildflower Photos
The photos featured here are usually taken by park staff and volunteers from all over the park. Share your own wildflower photos in the Mount Rainier Flickr group! Higher resolution versions of wildflower photos are available on Mount Rainier’s Flickr page.

Plan Your Visit
Paradise
and
Sunrise are two of the main visitor center areas at Mount Rainier National Park. Both areas are well known for their impressive wildflower meadows. The park also maintains dozens of trails perfect for wildflower viewing.

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | June 15, 2019

Wildflowers Around California 6/15/19

Botanical Wanderings – California has new wildflower posts with photos from

  • Lightning Ridge Nature Trail, Angeles National Forest
  • Clover Springs Preserve
  • Ano Nuevo

California Wildflower Report has new wildflower posts with photos from

  • June Lake
  • Gabrielino Trail to get to Sturtevant Falls in Altadena, CA

Marin CNPS has a new post with Flowrs from Ring Mt.

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | June 15, 2019

Pollinator Week – June 17-23, 2019

Pollinator Week is Society June 17-23, 2019

Pollinator Week is fast approaching–this national celebration extends from Monday, June 17 to Sunday, June 23! The Xerces Society has a wide variety of events from coast to coast during this time, and we invite you to join us. You can also participate remotely by signing up for a webinar on insect declines presented by our executive director, Scott Hoffman Black, on Tuesday, June 18 (click here to register for the webinar). Check out our events page for the full list of activities and registration information. We hope to see you soon!
Find a Xerces Event Near You
More Ways to Celebrate Pollinator Week

Sign the Pollinator Protection Pledge
Join 8,000+ people in making the commitment to protect pollinators. Learn More & Sign

Use the Pollinator Conservation Resource Center to Create Habitat
Get regional information–including plant lists and local seed and plant vendors–to help you build or expand upon pollinator habitat in your garden, on your farm, or in your community.   Learn More

Mobilize Your Community to Protect Pollinators
Bee City USA galvanizes communities to sustain pollinators by providing them with healthy habitat, rich in a variety of native plants, and free to nearly free of pesticides. Colleges and universities can become Bee Campuses, too! Learn More

via Celebrate Pollinator Week with the Xerces Society

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | June 14, 2019

Marin Wildflowers 6/13/19

See photo for Dias Ridge to Redwood Creek to Miwok Trail loop from the Marin CNPS at Marin Native Plants.

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | June 14, 2019

Angeles National Forest 6/11/19

California Wildflower Report has the following post

The Gabrielino Trail to get to Sturtevant Falls in Altadena, CA in the Angeles National Forest on June 10, 2019, for my photo hike. I thought the wildflowers superbloom was all over and finished here in Southern California, but I was surprised and delighted to find and photograph some of these wildflower beauties on my way to Sturtevant Falls waterfall!

See photos at California Wildflower Report – Home

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | June 14, 2019

Plant extinction ‘bad news for all species’

The BBC reports

Almost 600 plant species have been lost from the wild in the last 250 years, according to a comprehensive study.

The number is based on actual extinctions rather than estimates, and is twice that of all bird, mammal and amphibian extinctions combined.

Scientists say plant extinction is occurring up to 500 times faster than what would be expected naturally.

Read full article at  Plant extinction ‘bad news for all species’ – BBC News

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | June 13, 2019

Carson Pass Wildflower Prediction 6/12/19

Carson Pass Information Station reports

Let’s Talk Wildflowers!Up at the station we are most often called asking about our wildflowers and when they might bloom. The last photo in this set shows what the Carson Pass Trailhead looked like on Tuesday; can you see our information sign still a bit buried in the back? As the snow melts, the flowers and other plants of the Sierras need time, and space to grow. Please give the plants a chance and stay on trail so people can enjoy our wildflowers for decades to come! These corn lilies are just starting to sprout right in front of the station, can you find them all in the second photo? Yesterday it was 65F at the station, the snow is melting, but we don’t think we’ll start seeing flowers until Mid-July. Keep checking in here, and feel free to call the station for updates!

See photos at (3) Carson Pass Information Station – Home

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | June 13, 2019

Pt. Reyes Wildflowers 6/9/19

See photos from wildflowers of Point Reyes National Seashore taken over the last two weekends at (5) California Wildflower Tipline

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | June 13, 2019

LA National Forest Wildflowers 6/10/19

California Wildflower Report posted

I hiked the Gabrielino Trail to get to Sturtevant Falls in Altadena, CA in the Angeles National Forest on June 10, 2019, for my photo hike. I thought the wildflowers superbloom was all over and finished here in Southern California, but I was surprised and delighted to find and photograph some of these wildflower beauties on my way to Sturtevant Falls waterfall!

See photos at (3) California Wildflower Report – Home

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | June 13, 2019

The Shorebirds of Delaware Bay Are Going Hungry

The New York Times reports

On their migrations north, famished birds stop to feast on eggs laid by horseshoe crabs. But the crabs were overfished, and conservationists say that some bird species may not recover.

Read story at  The Shorebirds of Delaware Bay Are Going Hungry – The New York Times

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | June 12, 2019

Tehachapi Wildflowers 6-11-19

Botanical Wanderings – California reports

plenty still blooming in Tehachapi. Yesterday a hike I always do was nearly impassable with growth, which was a first. See photos at  (3) Botanical Wanderings – California

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | June 12, 2019

 Carson Pass Conditions 6-12-19

 Carson Pass Information Station has a new update

What a beautiful day it was up at Carson Pass today! Silver Lake is officially snow and ice free, well the lake is, the campsites are another story! Caples is melting, but there is still quite a bit more ice than what my dam photos are depicting… However you can see that there’s quite a bit of pollen dancing around!

Our friends at Caltrans, District 10 came and visited and repainted a bit!

Trail Report: South Bound towards Winnemucca there is still approximately 4 feet of snow on the ground in some areas. A skier said they skinned-up at our station and never had to take off their skis the entire way up (and down). It’s not clean snow, and it can be crusty in areas as well. North Bound towards Meiss looks like it’s melting quickly, but I didn’t receive any first hand accounts for that side today!

 

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | June 12, 2019

Henry Coe Wildflower Update 6/12/19

Henry Coe State Park has updated its wildflower bloom report at the Pine Ridge Association website with photos and a list of flowers now in bloom at: Henry W. Coe – Wildflower Guide.

New Website Link: Henry Coe has updated its website and changed the wildflower link. The new link is https://coepark.net/blooming 

 

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | June 12, 2019

White House Tried to Stop Climate Science Testimony

The New York Times reported

The White House tried to stop a State Department senior intelligence analyst from discussing climate science in congressional testimony this week, internal emails and documents show.

The State Department’s Bureau of Intelligence and Research declined to make changes to the proposed testimony and the analyst, Rod Schoonover, an adjunct professor at Georgetown University, was ultimately allowed to speak before the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence on Wednesday.

Read full story at White House Tried to Stop Climate Science Testimony, Documents Show – The New York Times

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | June 11, 2019

What to expect from Sierra trails this summer

Read about what to expect on the high country trails in the Sierra Nevada this season at What to expect from Sierra trails after an epic winter – SFChronicle.com

 

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | June 11, 2019

Global Big Day 2019: the biggest day in birding 

eBird reports on Global Big Day results.

On 4 May, 34,000 people ventured outside in 173 countries, finding 6,816 species: 2/3rds of the world’s bird species in a single day. This is a new world record for the number of people birding on a single day. Incredibly, 684 of the total species reported were observed by only one eBirder of the day, showing the difference that a single person can make.

Read more at : Global Big Day 2019: the biggest day in birding – eBird

eBird also reported

This past month (May 2019), your contributions lifted eBird to unprecedented heights: more than 20 million bird observations in a single month. This is an average of 7.5 observations every second, 24 hrs a day, for the entire month.

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | June 11, 2019

Wildflowers around California 6/9/19

California Wildflower Tipline has two new posts with photos

Sly Park, Pollack Pines 6-9-19, Lots of variety spread around the trail that circumnavigates Jenkinson Lake.

Placerita Canyon Nature Center, Newhall, CA, 6-7-19. Still a great variety of flowers to see on the trails. And although a few of the trails are still closed from the damage done by the 2016 Sand Fires and 2017 flooding, the other 5 trails are in great shape and offer beautiful scenery! Beauty is everywhere, go take a hike!

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | June 11, 2019

83 Environmental Rules Being Rolled Back Under Trump

The New York Times reports

A New York Times analysis, based on research from Harvard Law School, Columbia Law School and other sources, counts more than 80 environmental rules and regulations on the way out under Mr. Trump.

Read full story at  83 Environmental Rules Being Rolled Back Under Trump – The New York Times

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | June 10, 2019

Wildflowers Around California 6/9/19

California Wildflower Tipline has new photos for

  • Sly Park, Pollack Pines, 6/9/19
    Lots of variety spread around the trail that circumnavigates Jenkinson Lake.
  • Eastern Sierra – Swall Meadows
  • Henry Coe State Park -Mariposa Lilies found on spring trail to forest trail near HQ visitor center – Highway 33 about 1/2 mile past the turnoff for Rose Valley (about mile marker 20). The purple flowers are Poodle Dog Bush and cause very bad allergic reaction.
  • Castle Crags State Park
Posted by: Sandy Steinman | June 10, 2019

Homestead Valley Land Trust Wildflowers 6/9/19

Homestead Valley has a new wildflower update. See photos Homestead Valley June 9

NEW
– California coffeberry shrub is blooming in forests with clusters of white flowers.
– California honeysuckle is blooming with pink flowers on vines climbing bushes and trees.
– Hedge parsley*, native to Europe, is a listed invasive here. With pretty, carroty foliage, its small white flower clusters make vicious, prickly burrs when they go to seed. These burrs attach to socks or fur and are transported deep into our wildlands. Please weed now before the burrs are formed.
– Hellebore*, an orchid, is native to Eurasia and is blooming now in forests with stalks of greenish purple flowers.
– Lance leaf selfheal is blooming in bright sun with rich velvety purple whirled clusters.

Read More…

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | June 10, 2019

Lush underwater forests … in the Arctic 

EarthSky reports

Did you know that there are forests in the Arctic?

Lush underwater forests of large brown seaweeds (kelps) are particularly striking in the Arctic, especially in contrast to the land where ice scour (scraping of sea ice against the sea floor) and harsh climates leave the ground barren with little vegetation.

Kelp forests have been observed throughout the Arctic by Inuit, researchers and polar explorers. The Canadian Arctic alone represents 10 percent of the world’s coastlines, but we know little of the hidden kelp forests there.

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | June 9, 2019

Mt. Diablo Wildflowers 6/8/19

See photos for Mount Diablo State Park flowers in bloom at (3) California Wildflower Tipline

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | June 9, 2019

Marin Wildflowers 6/8/19

The Marin CNPS Facebook page has wildflower photos fromRodeo Beach, in the Marin Headlands and  Elephant Rocks, Dillon Beach at (6) Marin Native Plants

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | June 9, 2019

Climate Change is Giving Old Trees a Growth Spurt

ScienceDaily  reports

Larch trees in the permafrost forests of northeastern China — the northernmost tree species on Earth — are growing faster as a result of climate change. A new study of growth rings from Dahurian larch in China’s northern forests finds the hardy trees grew more from 2005 to 2014 than in the preceding 40 years.

Read story at Climate change is giving old trees a growth spurt — ScienceDaily

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | June 8, 2019

Clover Springs Preserve Wildflowers 6/7/19

See wildflower photos for Clover Springs Preserve in  Cloverdale in northern  Sonoma County at (6) Botanical Wanderings – California

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | June 8, 2019

Santa Monica Mountains Wildflowers 6/8/19

Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area has one new report

This has been a year when almost any hike you take in a wild place is going to give you a gratifying display of wildflowers. The popular media has frequently provided us all with dramatic flower reports and suggestions of where to see the more spectacular displays. Added to that is the drama and beauty of the recovering burned landscapes here in the Santa Monica Mountains. All in all this is a flower season not to be missed.

Malibu Creek State Park Backbone Trail 6/6
         There are still a lot of wildflowers blooming on the Backbone Trail where it crosses Piuma Road. I saw Golden Yarrow, Fern Leaf Phacelia, Indian Pinks, Wooley Blue Curl, Elegant Clarkia, Fleabane Aster,California Buckwheat, California Fuchsia, Orange Monkey Flower, Black Sage, Purple Sage, Bush Mallow, and Canyon Sunflower.
To access the Trailhead, drive up Piuma Road about 2 miles from Las Virgenes Road to the first big hair pin turn. This is where the Backbone Trail crosses Piuma. There is only parking for one car at the trailhead, so drive till you find a turnout to park in, and walk back down. Take the trail on the east side of the street.
Posted by: Sandy Steinman | June 8, 2019

Mt. Rainier Wildflowers 6/7/19

Mt. Rainier National Park reports

Currently Blooming

Fueled by warmer temps and spring rain, forest wildflowers are emerging and beginning to bloom. However, many of these early flowers take a little more effort to spot, like the big-leaved sandwort (Moehringia macrophylla). The whole plant is just a couple inches tall, with tiny white flowers.

Please Note: As snow melts away, it may be tempting to skirt remaining patches of snow that are covering trails. However, by going off trail you are walking on and damaging the wildflowers that you may be coming to see! It is better to stay on trail even if that means crossing snow, particularly in the high-visitation meadows around Paradise and Sunrise.

Wildflower Reports

  • Nisqually Entrance to Longmire ((6/6) – vanilla leaf, cow parsnip (early), three-leaved anemone, Piper’s anemone, big-leaved avens, bunchberry, columbine, tall bluebells, lupine
  • Longmire (6/6) – yellow violets, wild strawberry, Cascade oregongrape, heartleaf twayblade, mitrewort, salmonberry, slender bog orchid, bunchberry, three-leaved anemone, bear grass, alumroot, starflower, foam flower (early)
  • Longmire-Paradise Road (6/3) -Paradise is still snow covered, but as snow melts away from the road’s edge some flowers are appearing: scarlet paintbrush (near Ricksecker Point), phlox, trillium, rock penstemon, yellow violets, willow
  • Grove of the Patriarchs to Silver Falls (5/28)- wild strawberry, oregongrape, coral root, vanilla leaf, wood violet, twisted stalk, false Solomon’s seal, salmonberry, bleeding hearts, devil’s club, trillium, pippsissewa, twin flower, salal (early), bear grass

Wildflower Photos
The photos featured here are usually taken by park staff and volunteers from all over the park. Share your own wildflower photos in the Mount Rainier Flickr group! Higher resolution versions of wildflower photos are available on Mount Rainier’s Flickr page.

Plan Your Visit
Paradise
and
Sunrise are two of the main visitor center areas at Mount Rainier National Park. Both areas are well known for their impressive wildflower meadows. The park also maintains dozens of trails perfect for wildflower viewing.

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | June 8, 2019

Tioga Pass and Yosemite Roads Updates

Yosemite does not have an opening date for Tioga Road at this time. All other roads are now open. Current road status is posted at https://www.nps.gov/yose/planyourvisit/conditions.htm

Here is a current report on plans for repairs and expected delays this summer.

Road Work in Yosemite

The National Park Service (NPS) will be making repairs on numerous roadways throughout the park. A Yosemite NPS Project Manager is onsite to complete regular inspections and to ensure that the work complies with our environmental requirements, as well as the goals and mission of the National Park Service. An overview of each project is listed below along with an estimated schedule of delays for each. Email us if you have any questions.

Current Projects

Big Oak Flat and Tioga Road Delays (through summer 2019)

Beginning Monday, June 10, 2019 (conditions permitting), crews will begin pavement preservation work on the Big Oak Flat Road and adjoining secondary roads, such as the Hodgdon Meadow Road and Crane Flat Campground. The work consists of patching potholes, placing a seal coat, and then replacing the centerline rumble strips and re-striping the road. The Big Oak Flat Road work will begin at the northern park boundary and end at the Crane Flat intersection.

Once Tioga Road is open to traffic, the pavement preservation work will continue onto Tioga Road, with similar delays and traffic control. The pavement preservation work will continue through summer 2019.

Summer 2019

Monday – Friday: 7 am – 7 pm; Expect delays up to 15 minutes

No weekend, federal holiday, or night work is scheduled.


Power Line Repairs for Big Oak Flat Tunnel Lighting (June 2019)

Work will continue through the end of June with intermittent 15-minute delays as crews enter and exit the roadway with materials and supplies.


To find out more information about the current status of all park roads, call the park information line at 209/372-0200 (then 1, 1).

The New York Times reports

An all-white, albino panda has appeared in a natural reserve in China, the first of its kind to be documented, an expert said this week.

Read story and see photo at  White Panda Is Spotted in China for the First Time – The New York Times

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | June 7, 2019

World Oceans Day is June 8, 2019

EarthSky reports

How to celebrate World Oceans Day

World Oceans Day is June 8, 2019. It’s a time to celebrate the oceans and take steps to protect ocean health. The World Oceans Day 2019 website recommends three ways to participate in the day.

Browse event ideas and/or download resources. More promotional materials here (posters available in 17+ languages!). Find resources specific to plastic pollution here.

Register your event and activities at the World Oceans Day website.

Show your support on social media. Download social media assets including cover photos, social media tiles and more. Check out World Oceans Day gifs and stickers through Giphy. Follow @WorldOceansDay on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter and make sure to tag #WorldOceansDay!

Also, many zoos and aquariums are hosting special events for World Oceans Day. Check out a global map of World Oceans Day events for 2019 here.

Why celebrate Earth’s oceans at all? Whether you live near a coast, or not, we are all intimately connected with the oceans. Here are some of the connections:

Oceans cover 71% of Earth’s surface, and they hold 97% of our planet’s water.

The oceans help feed us and provide most of the oxygen that we breathe.

Oceans also play a key role in regulating the weather and climate. Water evaporating from the oceans falls inland as rain, which we then use to drink and grow crops.

A variety of life-saving medicinal compounds including anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer drugs have been discovered in the oceans.

The oceans provide us with abundant opportunities for recreation and inspiration.

Read more at WoWor How to celebrate World Oceans Day | Earth | EarthSky

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