Posted by: Sandy Steinman | March 25, 2018

Birding McLaughlin Eastshore SP In Albany 3/25/18

Today we went birding in McLaughlin Eastshore Park in Albany including the  Albany Mudflats. The most striking bird of the day was the Red-winged Blackbirds which were constantly displaying and singing loudly. There were large numbers of shorebirds in the Mudflats and shallow waters. American Avocets were starting to appear in their orange breeding plumage. Green-winged Teal were the most abundant duck and Western Sandpipers were the largest group of Shorebirds. We identified 29 species and another birder  reported seeing a pair Kites nesting and Allen’s Hummingbirds. The main native plant in flower was California Poppy.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Click Read more to see bird list for today

McLaughlin Eastshore SP–Albany access, Alameda, California, US Bird List  Mar 25, 2018 10:30 AM – 12:00 PM
Protocol: Traveling   1.5 mile(s)
Comments:     Included Albany Mudflats. Seen by another birder. Allen’s Hummingbird and two White-tailed Kites nesting.
29 species

Canada Goose  4
Northern Shoveler  4
American Wigeon  2
Mallard  4
Northern Pintail  4
Green-winged Teal  X
Clark’s Grebe  2
Great Egret  2
Snowy Egret  10
American Coot  X
American Avocet  X
Killdeer  1
Long-billed Curlew  2
Marbled Godwit  X
Dunlin  X
Least Sandpiper  X
Western Sandpiper  X
Willet  X
Western Gull  X
Caspian Tern  1
Forster’s Tern  X
Anna’s Hummingbird  3
American Crow  X
Barn Swallow  1
Golden-crowned Sparrow  4
Song Sparrow  2
California Towhee  1
Red-winged Blackbird  X
House Finch  2


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s

Categories

%d bloggers like this: