Posted by: Sandy Steinman | August 13, 2016

Mount Rainier Wildflowers 8/12/16

Mount Rainier National Park  reports

Currently Blooming – Updated August 12, 2016
Wildflowers are blooming throughout subalpine meadows in the park. Paradise meadows, Tipsoo Lake, and Berkeley Park near Sunrise are reported to have particularly nice displays. At Sunrise, look for patches of small-flowered penstemon (Penstemon procerus). In addition to being called small-flowered, this penstemon is also small in general compared to other penstemon found in the park. It grows to a maximum height of 12 inches (30 cm). It makes up for its small size with its bright blue-purple flowers.

Wildflower Reports

  • Sunrise (8/11) – grays lovage, small-flowered penstemon, bear grass, magenta paintbrush, cusick’s speedwell, subalpine daisy, mountain dandelion, aster, American bistort, alpine buckwheat, partridgefoot, white-flowered sickletop lousewort, pearly everlasting, sitka mountain ash, pink mountain heather, white mountain heather, shrubby cinquefoil, hellebore
  • Carbon Glacier Trail (8/4) – lower: candyflower, foam flower, bunchberry; upper: stonecrop, fireweed, oregon sunshine, harebell, pearly everlasting, yarrow, columbine
  • Tipsoo Lake (8/4) – lupine, magenta paintbrush, sitka valerian, beargrass
  • Mowich Lake (7/27) – lupine, rosy spirea, subalpine daisy, bear grass, pink mountain heather, white heather, grays lovage, birds beak lousewort, sitka valerian, jeffrey’s shooting star, partridgefoot, wild strawberry, slender bog orchid, fringecup, arrowleaf groundsel, white rhododendron
  • Silver Forest Trail (Sunrise) (7/23) – fan leaf cinquefoil, cusick’s speedwell, magenta paintbrush, tiger lily, alpine aster, gray’s lovage
  • Paradise (7/22) – glacier lily, cusick’s speedwell, avalanche lily, scarlet paintbrush, magenta paintbrush, buttercup, cinquefoil, sitka valerian, bracted lousewort, cascade blueberry, bear grass, arnica, pink heather, white heather, pasqueflower, marsh marigold, sitka mountain ash, jeffreys shooting star, alaska and leatherleaf saxifrage, partridgefoot, willowherb, elephanthead lousewort, agoseris, jacob’s ladder, lovage, rosy spirea, Lewis and mountain monkeyflower, bistort, bluebells, goat’s beard, edible thistle, subalpine daisy, groundsel, cow parsnip.

See photos and more information on Mt. Rainier Wildflowers at Discover Wildflowers – Mount Rainier National Park (U.S. National Park Service)

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | August 13, 2016

A 400-year-old Shark? 

The LA Times reports

In the frigid waters of the sub-Arctic ocean lurks a mysterious and slow-moving beast known as the Greenland shark. It’s a massive animal that can grow up to 20 feet in length. Now, new research suggests it may have a massive lifespan as well.

According to a paper published Thursday in Science, the Greenland shark could live for well over 250 years, making it the longest-living known vertebrate on Earth.

Read full story at  A 400-year-old shark? Greenland shark could be Earth’s longest-lived vertebrate – LA Times

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | August 12, 2016

 Lights Out For Fall Migration

Golden Gate Audubon reports

Fall migration is already underway, with thousands of shorebirds arriving or passing through the Bay Area. You can help them safely on their way through our Lights Out for Birds campaign:

  • Turn off unnecessary lights from dusk until dawn during migration season. Fall migration lasts from mid-August through November 30.
  • Wherever possible, use task lighting rather than overhead lighting. Or draw the blinds or drapes.
  • Install timers and motion detectors to minimize use of lights at night. PG&E offers rebates to business customers for these cost-saving technologies.
  • Share the Lights Out message via flyers, newsletters and social media. Post our flyer in your building.
  • Sign up as a Lights Out participant. This will help us track the program and its impact, as well as recognize your contribution to bird conservation!
  • Talk to your employer and co-workers about Lights Out.
  • Post Lights Out information in your office or on Facebook. 
You can download fact sheets and flyers from our web site. Print them out and share them with friends and co-workers!
Posted by: Sandy Steinman | August 11, 2016

Perseid Meteor Peaks Tonight

Space.com reports

The Perseid meteor shower returns in all its glory between August 11th and 12th, 2016. Here are the best places, times and tools to see it.

Read more Perseid Meteor Shower 2016: When, Where & How to See It

NPR says

Stargazers, get ready for something spectacular on Thursday. The annual Perseid meteor shower, already one of the most reliably impressive celestial events, promises to be especially good this year.

Source: Thursday’s Perseid Meteor Shower Is Going To Be Quite A Show — Here’s How To Watch : The Two-Way : NPR

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | August 10, 2016

Fall Garden Workshops and Plant Sales around the Bay

.

A list of fall California Native Plant Workshops and Plant Sales around the Bay this fall. Reprinted from the Regional Parks Botanic Garden Newsletter

  • Bringing Back the Natives, the venerable East Bay organization that has helped popularize native plants and habitats, has a full roster of native garden workshops in September, October, and November.
  • The “Native Plant Sale Extravaganza” on Sunday, October 23 is held at a number of nurseries around the East Bay (including at our neighboring U.C. Berkeley Botanical Garden). The sale is a partial fundraiser for Bringing Back the Natives.
  • The CNPS Yerba Buena Chapter in San Francisco and northern San Mateo County will hold their fall plant sale October 24 in San Francisco; the chapter offers plants propogated from local stock within their chapter area.
  • The CNPS Calscape website jumpstarts your research with an easy and fun searchable database cross-indexed by geography, plant type, and cultivation requirements. Find native plants that can thrive in your own garden’s specific climate and zoom in on precisely the plant you seek (“part-shade plants native to Modoc County” or “vines native to Tulare County”).
  • Calscape is a cooperative project of several native plant organizations and herbaria, including UC Berkeley’s Jepson Herbarium. Every year, Jepson offers a rich assortment of workshops on California botany; the 2016 season is nearly over, but keep an eye out for the 2017 series which will run from winter into fall.

 

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | August 9, 2016

Are We Loving Our National Parks to Death?

The New York Times has an opinion piece on the conflict between making the national parks accessible to everyone and the possibly destruction of the parks by crowds of people. It is a difficult balance as more visitors means more advocates for the parks. Read article at Are We Loving Our National Parks to Death? – The New York Times

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | August 8, 2016

Buzzard Shooting License Issued In UK

The Independent reports

A licence to kill buzzards – a protected species that was hunted to extinction in many parts of Britain in the 19th century — has been issued by Natural England to “prevent serious damage” to young pheasants bred for sport shooting.

The decision was condemned by environmental groups, with one ecologist expressing the fear that the decision could be the first of many undermining wildlife protections following the vote to leave the European Union.

Campaigners had already predicted a “bonfire” of environmental regulations in the wakes of the Brexit referendum result in June. The European Union is widely recognised as having some of the strongest environmental laws in the world.

Read full story at Buzzard shooting licence issued to landowner, sparking fears hen harriers and peregrine falcons will be next | Environment | The Independent

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | August 7, 2016

2016 Winners of California Wildlife Photo of the Year

See the winners of the of California’s Watchable Wildlife California Wildlife Photo of the Year Contest at  California Wildlife Photo of the Year Contest

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | August 6, 2016

Wildflower & Butterfly Photos Of Eastern Europe

In June I did a trip to  Poland, Slovakia and Hungary through Natural History Travel. I have put together a collection of photos from the trip at Flickr.

See slideshow from the trip at Eastern Europe Slideshow  (Click on box in bottom right corner for full screen)

You can also go directly to the  album at Eastern Europe photo album

To see ID information click on photo when viewing in album mode to see ID.
If you are in slideshow mode, at the top of your screen are settings under option and show info that will reveal titles.

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | August 6, 2016

Mount Rainier Wildflowers 8/5/16

Mount Rainier National Park  reports


Currently Blooming – Updated August 5, 2016
Wildflowers are at or close to peak bloom in the subalpine meadows. Berkeley Park, Shadow Lake near Sunrise, Mowich and Tipsso Lake are all reported to have nice displays. Near the Carbon Glacier vista along the Carbon Glacier Trail, Cascade Stonecrop is blooming profusely. Cascade Stonecrop, or Spreading Stonecrop (Sedum divergens) forms mats of dark green bulbous leaves with bright yellow flowers. They prefer exposed rocky cliffs and slopes in subalpine areas. Another area to commonly find this flower is Burroughs Mountains.

Wildflower Reports

  • Carbon Glacier Trail (8/4) – lower: candyflower, foam flower, bunchberry; upper: stonecrop, fireweed, oregon sunshine, harebell, pearly everlasting, yarrow, columbine
  • Tipsoo Lake (8/4) – lupine, magenta paintbrush, sitka valerian, beargrass
  • Mowich Lake (7/27) – lupine, rosy spirea, subalpine daisy, bear grass, pink mountain heather, white heather, grays lovage, birds beak lousewort, sitka valerian, jeffrey’s shooting star, partridgefoot, wild strawberry, slender bog orchid, fringecup, arrowleaf groundsel, white rhododendron
  • Silver Forest Trail (Sunrise) (7/23) – fan leaf cinquefoil, cusick’s speedwell, magenta paintbrush, tiger lily, alpine aster, gray’s lovage
  • Paradise (7/22) – glacier lily, cusick’s speedwell, avalanche lily, scarlet paintbrush, magenta paintbrush, buttercup, cinquefoil, sitka valerian, bracted lousewort, cascade blueberry, bear grass, arnica, pink heather, white heather, pasqueflower, marsh marigold, sitka mountain ash, jeffreys shooting star, alaska and leatherleaf saxifrage, partridgefoot, willowherb, elephanthead lousewort, agoseris, jacob’s ladder, lovage, rosy spirea, Lewis and mountain monkeyflower, bistort, bluebells, goat’s beard, edible thistle, subalpine daisy, groundsel, cow parsnip.

See photos and more information on Mt. Rainier Wildflowers at Discover Wildflowers – Mount Rainier National Park (U.S. National Park Service)

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | August 6, 2016

New Zealand Aims To Be Rid Of Rats

NPR reports

When it comes to invasive predators, New Zealand smells a rat — and a stoat, and a possum. But not for long. By 2050, the island nation hopes to be rid of the invasive mammalian predators — completely. It’s a goal that was formally announced Monday by New Zealand’s prime minister, John Key. “While once the greatest threat to our native wildlife was poaching and deforestation, it is now introduced predators,”

Read full story at  New Zealand Aims To Be Rid Of Rats, Stoats And Possums By 2050 : The Two-Way : NPR

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | August 5, 2016

Photos Of Eastern Sierra Nevada/White Mountain

I have put together a collection of photos at Flickr from a recent trip to the Eastern Sierra Nevada and White Mountain at:  Eastern Sierra Nevada/White Mountain Slideshow  (Click on box in bottom right corner for full screen)

You can also go directly to the 2 page album at Eastern Sierra Nevada and White Mountain photo album

There was a question about how to access the ID’s for the photos. All photos have some ID information. All you have to do is click on photo when viewing in album mode to see ID.
If you are in slideshow mode on the top of your screen are settings under option and show info that will reveal titles.

 

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | August 5, 2016

What Animals Are Olympic Champs?

Golden Gate National Parks Conservancy has a story on what animals would get the gold metals if they competed in the Olympics

With the Rio Olympics set to open on August 5, we put all the animals in the Golden Gate National Parks and surrounding waters to compete in a variety of sporting challenges. (Disclaimer: This was purely an exercise of the imagination and no animals were harmed during the production of this E-ventures article.) So which species put their best foot, paw, wing, and fin forward? Deepest

Read story at Fastest, Farthest, Deepest: Olympic Champ Animals at Golden Gate

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | August 4, 2016

Legal Action To Protect Snowy Plover

News Release Center for Biological Diversity

Legal Action Launched to Protect Western Snowy Plovers From California Beach Resort

Construction of Sprawling “Eco-Resort” Will Likely Kill Threatened Shorebird

SAND CITY, Calif.— Environmental groups today sent a formal notice of intent to sue Security National Guarantee, the developer behind the Monterey Bay Shores Resort, a sprawling resort planned along the Monterey Bay that will bring thousands of visitors and harm a rare bird species, the western snowy plover. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has repeatedly criticized the development and argued that “take” — that is, the death or injury — of western snowy plovers will likely result from construction and use of the resort.

“This so-called ‘eco-resort’ will dramatically transform this stretch of California coast and could put one of the state’s rarest birds directly in harm’s way,” said Aruna Prabhala, a staff attorney at the Center for Biological Diversity. “Before construction begins on the development, SNG needs to do a lot more work to ensure that western snowy plovers won’t be hurt or killed during construction.”

Read More…

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | August 3, 2016

Carson Pass Wildflowers 8/3/16

Where to photograph in California – Yahoo Groups (Calphoto) has a new report for Carson Pass

 Just back from 3 days in Carson Pass. Flowers are still great and well worth the visit. Did a very long day hike: CP thru Meiss Meadows, up to Shower Lakes, up to Meiss Ridge, cross-country over Meiss Ridge, back to CP. Only areas that were low on flowers were first mile, and most of Meiss Meadow.

Next day: CP to Winnamucca to Round Top. Great flowers all day except first mile.

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | August 3, 2016

Washington Wildflowers: Naches Peak Loope 8/1/16

DesertUSA reports on Naches Peak Loope

August 1, 2016 Linc Report: Washington State – Some more early blooms from July 26 on Naches Peak Loop (off of Chinook Pass, Washington): Avalanche lilies, bear grass, paintbrush, red heather

See photos at Desert Wildflower reports

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | August 3, 2016

Only One Wolf Species in North America 

The New York Times reported on a study that reveals there is only one species of Wolf in North America

The first large study of North American wolf genomes has found that there is only one species on the continent: the gray wolf. Two other purported species, the Eastern wolf and the red wolf, are mixes of gray wolf and coyote DNA, the scientists behind the study concluded.

Read full story at  DNA Study Reveals the One and Only Wolf Species in North America – The New York Times

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | August 2, 2016

Henry Coe Wildflower Update 8/2/16

Henry Coe State Park has a new wildflower bloom report  for August 2 at the Pine Ridge Association website with photos and a list of flowers now in bloom at: Henry W. Coe – Wildflower Guide.

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | August 2, 2016

Successful Program Saves Tricolored Blackbirds

News Release Audubon California

100% of vulnerable Tricolored Blackbird colonies on farmland saved

Buy-out program successfully protects imperiled California species

San Francisco, Calif. – Through cooperative agreements with farmers in California’s Central Valley, a historic one hundred percent of rare Tricolored Blackbird colonies on agricultural fields were protected during the 2016 harvest season. Working with the USDA California Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) and their Regional Conservation Partnership Program (RCPP) Tricolored Blackbird Project, Audubon California helped seven farmers delay the silage harvest, saving roughly 57,000 birds on 378 acres.

“More than 90 percent of the world’s Tricolored Blackbirds live in California, so we have a special responsibility to protect them,” said Samantha Arthur, conservation program manager at Audubon California. “Reaching this milestone shows what private landowners can do to help a declining species and make a big conservation impact. There are many other threatened species we hope to protect through collaborations like this.”

Read More…

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | August 1, 2016

Eastern Sierra Photos

In a recent trip to the Eastern Sierra Nevada and White Mountains I experimented with taking photos with my iPhone.  Here are some of the better results.

 

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | August 1, 2016

Abbott’s Lagoon Birds and Wildflowers 7/31/16

Although it is past peak for wildflowers season and still early for fall birds there is plenty to see at Abbott’s Lagoon at Pt. Reyes on a Golden Gate Audubon Field. The coastal climate of cool temperatures and moisture from frequent fog results in there being flowers in bloom all year round. The birding highlights were watching a Peregrine Falcon swooping in low over the dunes and lagoon, Virginia Rail being heard early on by one of the leaders and an Elegant Tern. Also spotted was a Red-legged Frog. Click Read more to see bird and plant lists.

Read More…

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | August 1, 2016

Edgewood Park August Wildflowers

Friends of Edgewood Park have updated its website to show what plants are typically blooming in August. There are  photos of plants you might see. Explore plant locations, plant species, which plant blooms when, and answers to a host of other questions at What’s Blooming This Month.

 

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | August 1, 2016

CNPS Field Trips August 2016

August Field Trips for the California Native Plants Society:

(for more information on trips go to chapter websites; also check out late trip postings at chapter websites)

Bristlecone (Mono, Inyo and NE Kern counties) http://bristleconecnps.org/index.php

  • August 13, Saturday, Bristlecone Chapter Field Trip: East of Mono Lake, Anchorite Hills

East Bay CNPS http://www.ebcnps.org/

  • no field trips planned for August

Marin CNPS http://www.marin.edu/cnps/

  • Tomales Bay St. Park, Jepson-Johnstone Trail Tomales Bay State Park has botanical treasures any time of the year. Sunday, August 14, 10
  • Giacomini Wetlands Excursion An overview of the 2008 Wetlands Restoration, which converted the 550-acre site from a dairy diked off from Lagunitas Creek to a fully connected tidal wetland. Sunday, August 28, 11 a.m.–2 p.m.

Milo Baker (Sonoma county) http://milobaker.cnps.org/index.php/events/field-trips

  • Field trips are on pause for July and August

Napa Valley http://www.napavalleycnps.org/

North Coast http://northcoastcnps.org

  • Aug 5-7, Fri.-Sun. Del Norte Weekend.  Treasure hunts, hikes, campfires.

Santa Clara Valley http://www.cnps-scv.org/

Santa Cruz http://www.cruzcnps.org/field_trips.php

Yerba Buena (San Francisco/Northern San Mateo) http://www.cnps-yerbabuena.org/

  • Saturday, August 06, 2016 11:00am to 3:30pm
    Walk: Montara Mountain Manzanitas in Summer

If you are interested in information on other chapters go to: http://www.cnps.org/cnps/chapters/

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | July 31, 2016

Court Orders Closure of Vargas Plateau Regional Park

News Release East Bay Regional Parks

Court Orders Closure of Vargas Plateau Regional Park

The East Bay Regional Park District has closed Vargas Plateau Regional Park in Fremont after an Alameda County Superior Court judge ruled in favor of two neighbors concerned about the Park District’s improvements to the road leading to the park.

The closure is effective immediately and will remain in place until the matter is resolved. The Park District plans to appeal the decision requiring closure of the park.

“It’s extremely  unfortunate we’ve had to close this  new park due to a dispute with neighbors,” said Park District General Manager Robert Doyle. “We will  resolve this issue and re-open this publically-owned park as soon as possible.”

The ruling stems from a lawsuit filed in 2008 by two neighbors concerned about traffic and parking on Vargas Road and Morrison Canyon roads, the two roads leading to the park. As part of the settlement, the Park District widened portions of Vargas Road, removed roadside vegetation to improve sightlines, installed “No Parking” signs, limited parking to 25 spaces and encouraged visitors to reach the park via Vargas Road from the east, instead of Morrison Canyon Road from Fremont.

Read More…

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | July 30, 2016

Mount Rainier Wildflowers 7/29/16

Mount Rainier National Park  reports

Currently Blooming – Updated July 29, 2016
Berkeley Park and Glacier Basin are reported to be at peak bloom, with nice displays along Crystal Peak Trail. Mowich Lake is also close to peak bloom. White Rhododendron, also known as Cascade Azalea, is a common shrub found in the park on open slopes and meadow edges above 3,500 feet (1,066 meters). Unlike the large, many-petaled flowers of domesticated rhododendron, this wild species has simple five-petaled white flowers.

Wildflower Reports

  • Mowich Lake (7/27) – lupine, rosy spirea, subalpine daisy, bear grass, pink mountain heather, white heather, grays lovage, birds beak lousewort, sitka valerian, jeffrey’s shooting star, partridgefoot, wild strawberry, slender bog orchid, fringecup, arrowleaf groundsel, white rhododendron
  • Silver Forest Trail (Sunrise) (7/23) – fan leaf cinquefoil, cusick’s speedwell, magenta paintbrush, tiger lily, alpine aster, gray’s lovage
  • Paradise (7/22) – glacier lily, cusick’s speedwell, avalanche lily, scarlet paintbrush, magenta paintbrush, buttercup, cinquefoil, sitka valerian, bracted lousewort, cascade blueberry, bear grass, arnica, pink heather, white heather, pasqueflower, marsh marigold, sitka mountain ash, jeffreys shooting star, alaska and leatherleaf saxifrage, partridgefoot, willowherb, elephanthead lousewort, agoseris, jacob’s ladder, lovage, rosy spirea, Lewis and mountain monkeyflower, bistort, bluebells, goat’s beard, edible thistle, subalpine daisy, groundsel, cow parsnip.
  • Carbon River (7/19) – corydalis, bleeding heart, single delight, lupine, Queen’s cup, foam flower, twin flower, gnomeplant
  • Ipsut Pass (7/18) – valerian, cow parsnip, selfheal, tiger lily, grays lovage, buckwheat, arnica, sagewort, scarlet and harsh paintbrush, larkspur, western columbine, baneberry, waterleaf, penstemon, yarrow, pearly everlasting, stonecrop, goat’s beard, red elderberry, thimbleberry
  • Spray and Seattle Park (7/18) – western bog-laurel, slender bog orchid, pink and white mountain heather, jeffreys shooting star, many avalanche lilies
  • Paradise Valley Road (7/13) – avalanche lily, rosy spirea, pearly everlasting, bog orchid, pink and white heather, jeffrey shooting star, sitka mountain ash (early), penstemon, partridge foot

See photos and more information on Mt. Rainier Wildflowers at Discover Wildflowers – Mount Rainier National Park (U.S. National Park Service)

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | July 30, 2016

August 2016 Birding Field Trips

August 2016 Golden Gate Audubon Birding Field Trips

For more information on any of the trips below go to http://goldengateaudubon.org/field-trips/fieldtrips/

 

  • Abbott’s Lagoon, Pt Reyes National Seashore
    Sunday, July 31, 9:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m.
  • Tilden Nature Area, Tilden Regional Park, Berkeley
    Friday, August 5, 8:30 — 11:00 a.m.
  • Davis, Yolo CountySaturday, August 6, 9:00 a.m. — 1:00 p.m.
  • Middle Harbor Shoreline Park, Oakland
    Sunday, August 7, 12:30 – 3:30 p.m. (due to tides)
  • San Francisco Botanical Garden
    Sunday, August 7, 8:00 — 10:30 a.m.
  • Middle Harbor Shoreline Park, Oakland
    Friday, August 12, 9:00 – 11:00 a.m. 
  • Mountain View Cemetery, 5000 Piedmont Ave., Oakland
    Wednesday August 17,  8:30 – 10:00 a.m.
  • Corona Heights, San Francisco Friday, August 19, 8 – 10 a.m.
  • Fort Mason Community Garden, San Francisco
    Sunday, August 21, 8:00 — 10:00 a.m.
  • Lake Merritt and Lakeside Park, Oakland
    Wednesday, August 24, 9:30 a.m. – noon
  • Snag Lake Backpack Trip, Lassen Volcanic National ParkFriday – Monday, August 26-29
  • Hayward Shoreline, Alameda County
    Sunday, August 28, 8:00 a.m. — Noon


Posted by: Sandy Steinman | July 29, 2016

Arctic Birds May Have No Place To Breed

ScienceDaily reports

Climate change could make much of the Arctic unsuitable for millions of migratory birds that travel north to breed each year, according to a new international study. Suitable breeding conditions for Arctic shorebirds could collapse by 2070, according to biologists.

Read article at  Birds on top of the world, with nowhere to go — ScienceDaily

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | July 28, 2016

Carson Pass Wildflowers

Carson Pass Information Station has a “Meet the Flowers” presentation on 7/30/16 as well as some recent photos from the area.

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | July 28, 2016

Wenatchee National Forest Wildflowers 7/24/16

Pacific Northwest Wildflowers has a detailed list of plants and animals seen in the Upper Conrad Basin in in Wenatchee National Forest in the Cascades in Washington State at Wildflower bloom in Upper Conrad Basin, Above the South Fork Tieton Loop Trail #1120 and between the Klickton Divide and Conrad Creek and Above the Pack Trail, Wenatchee National Forest…….July 22-24, 2016.

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | July 28, 2016

New Data On Climate’s Impact On Bird Populations

Science Daily reports

A new study of population trends among 46 ecologically diverse bird species in North America overturns a long-held assumption that the climate conditions occupied by a species do not change over time. Instead, birds that have increased in abundance over the last 30 years now occupy a wider range of climate conditions than they did 30 years ago, and declining species occupying a smaller range.

Read story at New data on bird population trends and the climate conditions they occupy: Work contributes to more accurate future species distribution models — ScienceDaily

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