Posted by: Sandy Steinman | January 9, 2021

CNPS SCV Native Plant Lecture Series

The Santa Clara Valley CNPS has an upcoming talk on Wednesday, January 13, 2021 7:30pm on “The Amazing Manzanita and All Her Relations” by Kate Marianchild. Learn more about this talk and register as well as see links to past talks at CNPS SCV Native Plant Lecture Series

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | January 9, 2021

UC Botanical Garden Seasonal Programs & Workshops

While in-person UC Botanical Garden programs are suspended during this time, there is a calendar of offerings Please check here for the most current information on upcoming and past programs at UC Botanical Garden Zoom Programs

or email gardenprograms@berkeley.edu with questions or to be added to a program wait list.

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | January 8, 2021

California revised travel advisory

On January 6, 2021, the State of California and the California Department of Public Health updated their guidelines and issued a revised travel advisory asking people to “avoid non-essential travel to any part of California more than 120 miles from one’s place of residence.” Additionally, “non-essential travelers from other states or countries are strongly discouraged from entering California.” See the full order here: Travel Advisory (ca.gov).

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | January 8, 2021

Job Oportunities: Riparian Botanists

Riparian Botanists, Summer 2021 – University of Montana

The University of Montana’s Ecological Mapping, Monitoring, and Analysis Lab (EMMA) is currently recruiting RIPARIAN BOTANISTS I and II for the 2021 field season. We will again partner with the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) to implement their Aquatic Assessment, Inventory, and Monitoring (AIM) strategy, which is targeted at collecting standardized data from streams across BLM Districts in the western U.S. The Riparian Botanist works with a two-person Aquatic Team, collecting vegetation composition data along stream greenlines. Sites range from remote mountain streams rarely visited by people to well-used rangeland watercourses. Botanists should expect to encounter a wide diversity of species and to gain experience in several different biophysical environments.

All positions are field-based and require primitive camping in isolated regions. Crews will typically work eight 10-hour days, from Tuesday to Tuesday, with a six-day break between hitches. We expect staff to commit to the entire field season and contribute to building a safe, productive and enjoyable work environment.

Work will focus on wadeable streams and rivers in Nevada (crews based in Elko and Carson City) and Wyoming (crews based in Cody and Kemmerer).

JOB LENGTH: June through September 2021 (Wyoming), late April – August or September (Nevada)
COMPENSATION: $14- $18 per hour based on experience+ $30 per diem for field days

TO APPLY: Please submit letter of interest, CV, and three (3) professional references to Heidi Anderson (heidi.anderson@mso.umt.edu). Please mention your location preference, if any (NV, WY). The subject line should read: 2021 Aquatic AIM Application

DEADLINE: Application review begins immediately and continues until all positions are filled.

QUALIFICATIONS:

BOTH POSITIONS REQUIRE THE FOLLOWING:

• Experience following established field protocols to conduct sampling and field data collection;
• Experience with data entry and Microsoft Office (Word, Excel, Access);
• Valid driver’s license and clean driving record (DUI or other serious convictions need not apply);
• Demonstrated ability to work productively as part of a team to accomplish mutual goals and to work independently as required;
• Experience in and willingness to spend multiple days camping in the field;
• Willingness to work irregular hours in harsh environments and challenging weather, and carry gear over uneven terrain;

RIPARIAN BOTANIST I

• A Bachelor’s Degree in Botany, Ecology, Wetland Ecology or closely related subject. Coursework in Botany, Plant Taxonomy and/or Systematics. Herbarium experience may substitute for coursework;
• A minimum of one season of botany field work in wetland or riparian habitats;
• Ability to identify riparian graminoids, forbs, shrubs and trees to species using dichotomous keys;
• Good familiarity with commonly accepted plant nomenclature.

RIPARIAN BOTANIST II

• A Bachelor’s Degree or higher in Botany, Ecology, Wetland Ecology or closely related subject;
• Coursework in Botany, Plant Taxonomy and/or Systematics with additional training in wetland/riparian plant identification. Herbarium experience may substitute for coursework;
• A minimum of two seasons of botany field work, preferably in wetland or riparian habitats;
• Ability to identify riparian graminoids, forbs, shrubs and trees to species using dichotomous keys;
• Familiarity with plants of the Pacific Northwest, Rocky Mountain West or Intermountain West;
• Ability to identify riparian graminoids, forbs, shrubs and trees to species using dichotomous keys;
• Good familiarity with commonly accepted plant nomenclature;
• Ability to prepare herbarium and/or voucher specimens desired.

The work is physically demanding. Crews typically work in all kinds of weather, and frequently have to navigate poorly maintained roads or travel by foot across uneven terrain to access a site. The “wadeable streams” we sample range from a few inches deep to fast-flowing small rivers that require good balance, a stout stadia rod, and a willingness to wade as necessary.

Work will begin with paid training in late April for Nevada crews and early June for Wyoming and Idaho crews, and will continue until August or September, with the exact end date being flexible to accommodate those with academic commitments.

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | January 8, 2021

Nature First – guidelines for responsible nature photography

NATURE FIRST PRINCIPLES OVERVIEW

Nature First is built on seven core principles that help communicate how each of us can enjoy nature photography responsibly. The Seven Principles of Nature First Photography were developed to help educate and guide both professional and recreational photographers in sustainable, minimal impact practices that will help preserve nature’s beautiful locations. #naturefirst

THE NATURE FIRST PRINCIPLES

  1. Prioritize the well-being of nature over photography.

  2. Educate yourself about the places you photograph.

  3. Reflect on the possible impact of your actions.

  4. Use discretion if sharing locations.

  5. Know and follow rules and regulations.

  6. Always follow Leave No Trace principles and strive to leave places better than you found them.

  7. Actively promote and educate others about these principles others about these principles.

Learn more at Nature First
Posted by: Sandy Steinman | January 7, 2021

USFS Extends Developed Campground Closures

USDA Forest Service Pacific Southwest Region has decided to extend the developed campground closure on 12 National Forests in California to provide consistent COVID-19 mitigation response in accordance with Gov. Gavin Newsom’s Stay-at-Home Orders. These Regional Orders will be in effect through January 29, 2021.

The closed campgrounds on National Forests are in California’s Greater Sacramento, Southern, and San Joaquin zones, including Angeles NF, Cleveland NF, Eldorado NF, Inyo NF, Los Padres NF, Lake Tahoe Basin Management Unit, Plumas NF, San Bernardino NF, Sequoia NF, Sierra NF, Stanislaus NF, and the Tahoe NF. Day use of National Forests will remain open for the health and welfare of Californians. We urge all visitors to follow CDC guidelines to recreate responsibly and check with your local National Forests before visiting.

“This order extension will protect visitors and our employees by reducing exposure to COVID-19 and mitigating the further burden on limited healthcare facilities,” said Randy Moore, Regional Forester of the USDA Forest Service’s Pacific Southwest Region.

Regional Orders 21-1, 21-2, and 21-3 are linked within. The Pacific Southwest Region’s eighteen National Forests align with the state of California’s zones as follows: Southern – San Bernardino, Los Padres, Cleveland, Angeles, Inyo National Forests Northern – Mendocino, Modoc, Six Rivers, Shasta-Trinity, Klamath, Lassen National Forests San Joaquin – Stanislaus, Sierra, Sequoia National Forests Greater Sacramento – Eldorado, Tahoe, Plumas National Forests, Lake Tahoe Basin Management Unit (LTBMU).

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | January 7, 2021

Nest in Place

from the Oakland Museum

Nest in Place with OMCA

Discover the world of California birds wherever you are, from the Oakland Museum of California’s Gallery of California Natural Sciences to your home. Get creative with bird-themed games, learn tips for beginning birding, explore bird sounds from the California Library of Natural Sounds, and more. Check back often for more activities being hatched up!

VISIT: https://museumca.org/nest-in-place

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | January 7, 2021

Great Backyard Bird Count Photo Winners

See the winners of the 2020 Great Backyard Bird Count winners as well as historical galleries of past winners at Great Backyard Bird Count photos

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | January 6, 2021

New Land Acquisition For Anza-Borrego

from the Anza-Borrego Foundation

As most of you know, as part of our mission, Anza-Borrego Foundation acquires privately owned parcels within the Park boundaries to make the Park ‘whole’. The transfer of 17,597 acres from the Anza-Borrego Foundation (ABF) to the Park, one of the largest land transfers by a nonprofit cooperating association in California State Parks’ history, was approved in a session by the State of California Public Works Board in December. 

This transfer involving 331 parcels has been an extremely complex and lengthy process that involves financial, environmental, title and other reviews by the State. With this crucial step complete, the land transfer is now officially in escrow! 

This land transfer marks a significant, historic moment for ABF, the Park and all of our major donors who have been vital in helping to make this possible. 

Key highlights of transfer:

  • Extends Anza-Borrego Desert State Park to near the Mexican border/Baja California, a key step towards establishing a binational wildlife corridor for endangered desert bighorn sheep and other wildlife.
  • Joins Cuyamaca Rancho State Park with Anza-Borrego Desert State Park, connecting mountains to desert, helping sustain biological diversity, ecological complexity, and opportunities for climate change adaptations.
  •      Helps protect wildflower parcels that had previously been under threat for development and habitat fragmentation, which represents a major benefit for a coordinated tourism effort and the town of Borrego Springs.
  • Completes transfer of private in-holdings that can lead to public access and resource management issues as well as resource damage.

We will be sharing more about the completion of the land transfer with you in the coming weeks. Escrow is expected to close in early 2021

The New York Times  reports

The Trump administration gutted protections for migratory birds on Tuesday, delivering a parting gift to the oil and gas industry, which has long sought to be shielded from liability for killing birds unintentionally in oil spills, toxic waste ponds and other environmental disasters.

The final rule comes less than a month before President-elect Joseph R. Biden Jr. takes office. While Mr. Biden has not explicitly pledged to repeal the measure, his choice for interior secretary, Representative Deb Haaland of New Mexico, is widely expected to do so.

Read more at Trump Administration, in Parting Gift to Industry, Reverses Bird Protections 

Queen’s University Belfast reports

Research led by Queen’s University Belfast has found that man-made noise changes the signals of animals, hampering their communication with each other.

The meta-analysis study found animals exposed to human-made noise had to adjust their acoustic signals when competing for mate attraction, to repel rivals and parent-offspring communication, all of which have a crucial role in their survival. 

The study is the first to look at a variety of different species and their response to noise and has been published today (Wednesday 2 December) in Global Change Biology. 

Read more at QUB Homepage – Featured RESEARCH Articles | New research shows noise pollution is hampering communication of a number of dif | News | Queen’s University Belfast

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | January 4, 2021

Support the Marin CNPS  to Oppose E-bikes on MMWD Lands

Support the Marin CNPS  to Oppose E-bikes on MMWD Lands

As E-bikes rise in popularity, Marin Municipal Water District (MMWD) is considering allowing Class I E-bikes on the parts of their trail system where bikes are allowed – on fire roads. They have solicited input from the MMWD community with meetings and formed a Community Advisory Committee (CAC) to address the issue. Marin CNPS has been following these meetings and opposes the use of E-bikes on MMWD lands beyond where other motor vehicles can travel.  Public comments by Conservation Chair Eva Buxton and Co-President David Long have pointed out potential E-bike threats to MMWD wildlands.

MMWD acknowledges there is clear evidence of construction of illegal trails and illegal bicycle usage of single-track trails throughout the Mt. Tamalpais watershed. These activities can impact wildlife, increase erosion and sedimentation of streams, introduce non-native/invasive species, and threaten special status plant and animal species and sensitive habitats. Wherever human powered mountain bikes go, E-bikes will follow. The threats to wildlands would be exacerbated by E-bikes which are heavier than regular bikes, have low-end torque, and can go faster. In addition, E-bikes allow riders to cover more distance on each trip, getting them to areas difficult for rangers to patrol.

Read More.

Center for Biological Diversity News Release

593 Florida Manatees Died in 2020, Including At Least 90 From Boat Strikes

Proposed Legislation Would Expand Requirements for Boater Safety Education

ST. PETERSBURG, Fla.— Florida wildlife officials have proposed new boating safety education requirements after another year of accidents and collisions took a deadly toll on people and the state’s imperiled manatees. At least 593 Florida manatees died in 2020, including 90 from boat strikes, according to records obtained from state officials.

Read More…

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | January 3, 2021

UC – Berkeley Botanical Garden Photos 1/2/21

Photos from a visit to the UC-Berkeley Botanical Garden on January 2, 2021. It was a rainy, overcast day that created interesting light and loads of raindrops to work with.

The garden is currently open daily to the public from eleven to five by reservation .  Garden members can enter at ten. There is an entrance fee (free for garden members) and paid parking.  For more information and to make reservations  go to UC-Botanical Garden.

This is part of my continuing pandemic project,  the “Stay at Home Photo Project”.  It includes many street photos from Berkeley and Albany as well as photos from the UC Berkeley campus, my yard, local botanic gardens, and neighbors’ yards  You can see larger higher quality versions of many of the photos at Flickr in my collection Stay at Home Photo Project.

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Posted by: Sandy Steinman | January 3, 2021

California State Parks, Mojave Area Updates

California State Parks, Mojave Area Updates
  • Antelope Valley Indian Museum: Indoor museums are currently closed in Los Angeles County until further notice per Health Officer Order. Upon reopening, the museum will have COVID safety protocols in place until all restrictions are lifted. http://AVIM.parks.ca.gov
  • Antelope Valley California Poppy Reserve: The park is currently open for day use and hiking. Wildflower bloom predictions and updates will begin in February, and operational adjustments to address COVID safety during the bloom season will be assessed at that time. Visit www.parks.ca.gov/PoppyReserve for information and updates.
  • Red Rock Canyon State Park: Ricardo Campground and the Visitor Center museum are currently closed. The park is open for day use and hiking. The visitor center information desk is currently open on weekends with limited occupancy. www.parks.ca.gov/RedRockCanyonStatePark
  • Saddleback Butte State Park: The campground, visitor center and Avenue K entrance are closed. The picnic area and hiking trails can be accessed at the day-use entrance, at 170th Street East and East Avenue J (Lancaster). www.parks.ca.gov/SaddlebackButte
Posted by: Sandy Steinman | January 3, 2021

2021 Fee-free days at National Parks

The National Park Service has released the dates for fee-free days at all sites.
The 2021 entrance fee-free days are:
  • Monday, January 18 – Martin Luther King, Jr. Day
  • Saturday, April 17 – First Day of National Park Week
  • Wednesday, August 4 – Great American Outdoors Act anniversary
  • Wednesday, August 25 – National Park Service Birthday
  • Saturday, September 25 – National Public Lands Day
  • Thursday, November 11 – Veterans Day
Note that the entrance fee waiver for the fee-free days does not cover amenities or user fees for activities such as camping, transportation, or special tours.
Posted by: Sandy Steinman | January 3, 2021

Plant Visits on the East Bay Shoreline

The East Bay Chapter of the California Native Plant Society writes about where to see plants along the East Bay Shoreline

San Francisco Bay shoreline has scattered pockets of open space, with some room for coastal plant communities. Development surrounds shoreline plants, with remnant natural sites hemmed in by airports, refineries, marinas, and freeways.

Read about the many locations to see plants along the East Bay Shoreline at Plant Visits on the East Bay Shoreline

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | January 2, 2021

How The Pandemic’s Reduced Noise Benefited Birds

The San Francisco Chronicle reports

Phillips and her collaborators at Cal Poly may be the first researchers to document the coronavirus pandemic’s impact on songbird behavior. Their research, published in the journal Science this year, found that the sparrows sang about 30% quieter during the pandemic compared to previous decades.

“It’s pretty exciting that they responded so fast to the sudden change in the sound of the city,” she said.

The findings could have broad implications beyond birds. Conservation efforts have historically focused on restoring lost animal habitats, but have rarely considered the detrimental effects of urban noise. It’s a factor worth considering, Phillips said, especially as California contemplates a future full of electric cars.

 Read more at Since shelter in place, Bay Area sparrows are singing in tones that researchers haven’t heard in decades – SFChronicle.com

 

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | January 1, 2021

Top Bay Nature Magazine Stories of 2020 

Check out Bay Nature’s top stories from this most unusual year at  Top Bay Nature Magazine Stories of 2020 – Bay Nature

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | December 31, 2020

Pt. Reyes Drakes Beach Closure Alert

Pt. Reyes National Seashore announcement

Drakes Beach Closure Alert❗️🛑
The elephant seal season is ramping up, which means more seals are arriving onshore and new pups are being born every day. To protect the elephant seal pups from disturbance and to keep the public safe, Drakes Beach will be closed starting at the southern edge of the cove in front of the Kenneth C. Patrick Visitor Center and continuing southwest to the end of Drakes Beach. This closure will be enforced starting Thursday, December 31, and will continue until March 31.
Please respect this seasonal closure and help protect the elephant seals during this sensitive time. You can still access Drakes Beach in front of the visitor center and enjoy a beach walk to the east (left of the visitor center).
Learn more about the elephant seals at Point Reyes here: https://go.nps.gov/pore/eseals
Posted by: Sandy Steinman | December 31, 2020

Cal Poly Study Shows Birdsongs Benefit Humans

Cal Poly news release

If you thought your morning hike was contributing to your well-being, a new Cal Poly study shows that you’re right, especially if our avian friends were singing while you strolled.

A growing body of research shows that time spent in nature contributes to human mental health. Although many studies have found that humans benefit from spending time in nature, few studies have explored why.

A Cal Poly research team investigated how much the natural sounds humans hear during their time in the great outdoors contribute to this sense of well-being.

Read more at Cal Poly Study Shows Birdsongs Benefit Humans – Cal Poly News – Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | December 30, 2020

Redwood National and State Parks Road Closure

Redwood National and State Parks announced

Today, a large redwood fell across Howland Hill Road. As a result, the western access (Crescent City side) of Howland Hill Road is now temporarily closed. It may be a week before this part of the road is reopened. Access to Stout Grove and Boy Scout Trail from the east remains open. These conditions – and access to trails along Howland Hill Road – might change as crews remove the tree.

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | December 30, 2020

Job Opening: BLM Botanist position in Bakersfield Field Office

Location: Bakersfield, CA     Open: 12/21/2020 – 1/12/2021

Merit Announcement No: CAMP-20-10929242-CH

DE Announcement No: CADE-20-10929241-CH

Merit Announcement is open to: Competitive Current or Former Federal Employees, Non-Competitive Current Federal Employee or Reinstatement Eligible, 30% or More Disabled Veterans, Competitive Veterans Employment Opportunities Act (VEOA), Former Public Land Corps (PLC), Land Management Workforce Flexibility Act (LMWFA), Persons eligible under other Special Hiring Authorities, and Career Transition Assistance Plan (CTAP), Interagency Career Transition Assistance Plan (ICTAP) within local commuting area.

DE Announcement is open to: All US Citizens

To apply, click on this link: Merit USAJOBS or DE USAJOBS

For more information about BLM please visit the BLM Careers Page

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | December 30, 2020

UC – Berkeley Botanical Garden Photos 12/29/20

Photos from a visit to the UC-Berkeley Botanical Garden on December 29, 2020. All photos were taken in the Mather Redwood Grove section, which is across the street from the main garden. All plants in the grove are native to California .

The garden is currently open daily to the public from eleven to five by reservation .  Garden members can enter at ten. There is an entrance fee (free for garden members) and paid parking.  For more information and to make reservations  go to UC-Botanical Garden.

This is part of my continuing project,  the “Stay at Home Photo Project”.  It includes many street photos from Berkeley and Albany as well as photos from the UC Berkeley campus, my yard and neighbors’ yards  You can see larger higher quality versions of many of the photos at Flickr in my collection Stay at Home Photo Project.

 

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Posted by: Sandy Steinman | December 30, 2020

Don’t Get Between a Caterpillar and Its Milkweed

The New York Times reports

When food gets scarce, monarch butterfly caterpillars will turn on each other, duking it out for the rights to grub, according to a paper published Thursday in the journal iScience. The jousts don’t get bloody. But they involve plenty of bumping, boxing and body-checking — all the makings of a big brawl of babies, in a hurry to bulk up before they sprout their grown-up wings.

Read more at  Don’t Get Between a Caterpillar and Its Milkweed – The New York Times

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | December 29, 2020

UC – Berkeley Botanical Garden Photos 12/28/20

Photos from a visit to the UC-Berkeley Botanical Garden on December 28, 2020.

The garden is currently open daily to the public from eleven to five by reservation .  Garden members can enter at ten. There is an entrance fee (free for garden members) and paid parking.  For more information and to make reservations  go to UC-Botanical Garden.

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Posted by: Sandy Steinman | December 29, 2020

Anza- Borrego Desert Natual History Association Webinars

Anza- Borrego Desert Natual History Association Webinars has a series of upcoming webinars and past webinars that place in the desert and afar at Anza-Borrego Desert Natural History Association Webinars

Past Webinars available on YouTube include:

  • Earth’s Changing Oceans
  • Life as a Reptile

Upcoming webinars that you can register are 

  • Jan. 8,  Fri., 6:30 p.m. – 7:30 p.m.
    California Indian Basketry: Ikons of the Florescence
  • Jan. 15 Fri., 6:30 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
     Discover the Faroe Islands
  • Jan, 22 Fri., 6:30 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
    Webinar: Geology and Tectonics of San Diego County, a Quick Trip Through Geologic Time   Don Barrie, Geologist, Professor  Mesa College
  • Feb. 5 Fri., 6:30 –  7:30 p.m.Orphaned Films, Revisiting Days Gone By with Rediscovered Films   Pea Hicks, discoverer and restorer of old films
  • Feb. 12 Fri., 6:30 –  7:30 p.m. Swainson’s Hawk: A Journey that Begins in Argentina
    Hal Cohen, founder Borrego Valley Hawk Watch
  • Feb. 19 Fri., 6:30 p.m. – 8:00 p.m. Journey to Greenland: the People, the Ice, the Land, and the Sea
    Presenter: Mike McElhatton
  • Feb. 26, Fri., 6:30 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.  The Incredible Journey of the Monarch Butterfly
    Presenter: Susie Vanderlip, Monarch Conservation Specialist      
Posted by: Sandy Steinman | December 29, 2020

Mass die-off of birds in south-western US ’caused by starvation’

The Guardian reports

The mass die-off of thousands of songbirds in south-western US was caused by long-term starvation, made worse by unseasonably cold weather probably linked to the climate crisis, scientists have said.

Flycatchers, swallows and warblers were among the migratory birds “falling out of the sky” in September, with carcasses found in New Mexico, Colorado, Texas, Arizona and Nebraska. A USGS National Wildlife Health Center necropsy has found 80% of specimens showed typical signs of starvation.

Read more at Mass die-off of birds in south-western US ’caused by starvation’ | Environment | The Guardian

Posted by: Sandy Steinman | December 28, 2020

Natural Resource Management Intern II at the County of San Mateo

San Mateo County Parks system consists of 22 parks, historic sites, and regional trails. The properties have a wide variety of habitats, species, and visitor use.The Natural Resource Management Program is focused on protecting and enhancing all natural resources within the park system. This includes habitat restoration, vegetation and invasive species management, native and invasive species mapping, wildlife monitoring, and volunteer stewardship activities.

The Natural Resource Management Intern II will report to San Bruno Mountain State and County Park, Coyote Point Recreation Area, or 455 County Center, Redwood City. The intern’s primary duties will be in supporting wildlife and plant research and monitoring efforts for the San Bruno Mountain Habitat Conservation Plan.

Read More…
Posted by: Sandy Steinman | December 28, 2020

Court Blocks Drilling Set to Begin in Newly Designated Utah Wilderness

Center for Biological Diversity News Release

WASHINGTON— A federal judge today enjoined the Trump administration’s approval of a plan to punch a helium well into the heart of the Labyrinth Canyon Wilderness in Utah just two days before Christmas. Road construction was set to begin Wednesday.

“Labyrinth Canyon Wilderness is too special to drill,” said Landon Newell, staff attorney with the Southern Utah Wilderness Alliance. “We’re grateful the court enjoined this ill-conceived project and gave this incomparable landscape a brief reprieve. We’ll be ready for round 2 with the Trump administration and company in early January.”

Read More…

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