Posted by: Sandy Steinman | September 21, 2018

Eastern National Forests Fall Color 9/21/18

Eastern Region National Forests reports for September 21, 2018

Illinois

Midewin National Tallgrass Prairie

The prairie abounds with colors this time of year. From the blues and purples of New England aster and smooth blue aster to the yellows of stiff and Riddell’s goldenrod. The foliage has not started to turn; however, a very unique burst of orange color has been found the trees this last week at several locations on the Midewin – created by roosting Monarch butterflies! The generation that migrates to Mexico is beginning to group together before they head south. For a nice fall walk, check out Iron Bridge Trailhead or Prairie Creek Woods Trail.

Indiana

Hoosier National Forest

One can now see many changes on the Hoosier National Forest. From less than 5% color change last week to roughly 20% color change this week. For the most part the tree tops are now turning brown and yellow and orange; still very few reds. Though this is a great preview of what is to come. Temperatures will be very high this week and weekend. Hopefully next week we will have dropping temperatures to aid our trees in color change and increase visitation during this beautiful time of year. A drive through the forest this week would still be much different than last week, and so on throughout the fall!

Massachusetts

Urban Connections – Boston

Most trees around the city of Boston are retaining their summer color, while some are beginning to show the early signs of fall.  A stroll within the Fenway section of the popular Emerald Necklace Park revealed trees showing touches of yellow in random patches within the canopy.  Cooler weather, with overnight dips into the low 50s, should encourage more fall color to materialize in the coming weeks.

Michigan

Huron-Manistee National Forests

The leaves on the Huron-Manistee National Forests are still predominantly green, very few have begun color change, though there are hints of yellow and orange. The morning sunrise is breathtaking because of the manner in which the sunlight hits the changing landscape. In addition, the late morning fog also adds a great deal of scenic vibes to the landscape. For a glimpse of early fall color and to learn some history, plan a visit to Lumberman’s Monument. For the latest updates related to the Forest’s fall colors, follow us on Facebook @Huronmanisteenfs or visit the Forest’s website.

Ottawa National Forest

Fall colors are occurring somewhat unevenly throughout the Forest. While some areas are bursting with color, other areas are still quite green. With the cooler weather we are having, it’s wonderful to see warm shades of orange, red, and yellow! For more information and predictions on Michigan fall colors, please visit https://www.michigan.org/fall.

Minnesota

Chippewa National Forest

Fall color is slowly starting here in the Chippewa National Forest. We are seeing a bit of yellow leaves mixed with the green. Cool nights in the Forest will bring some great fall color in the next few weeks!Superior National Forest

The Superior National Forest is changing fast, and is now at about 25% of color.  If you like some green mixed in with your reds and oranges, this is a great time to come visit. To catch a glimpse of some early color, consider a hike along Honeymoon Bluff Trail or Caribou Rock Trail.

Missouri

Mark Twain National Forest

On the Mark Twain, we are still a few weeks away from fall colors.  We have had some good rainfall across the Forest over the last few weeks, so we are hopeful for a good fall color display in mid to late October.  Right now, the heat is hanging on with temperatures in Rolla, MO around 90 degrees.

Ohio

Wayne National Forest

The colors of early fall are brightening the landscape! Jewelweed flowers look like little cornucopias, another symbol of the autumn harvest. They can be yellow or orange, as can be observed in the pollinator garden at our headquarters. They are also called touch-me-nots because their mature seed pods burst open when touched, which disperses the seeds. Jewelweed often grows in riparian areas, damp soils near streams and rivers. Fluids from their stems can be used to treat rashes from poison ivy and stinging nettles.

Pennsylvania

Allegheny National Forest

There is still very little color change in the Forest.  Black Cherry Trees are beginning to show shades of yellow.  Oaks, maples and beech remain in full green.  For a glimpse of fall color take a walk along Beaver Meadows Hiking Trail.

Vermont

Green Mountain-Finger Lakes National Forests

With shorter days and cooler night time temperatures, fall is certainly on the way. Some trees in the higher elevations have started to display slight shades of pink, orange, yellow and red while many trees in the lower elevations remain green. Vermont typically displays peak foliage in the second week of October.

West Virginia

Monongahela National Forest

The prairie is abound with colors this time of year. From the blues and purples of New England aster and smooth blue aster to the yellows of stiff and Riddell’s goldenrod. The foliage has not started to turn yet but a very unique burst of orange color has been found in trees around Midewin this last week created by roosting Monarch butterflies! The generation that migrates to Mexico is beginning to group together before they head south.

Wisconsin

Chequamegon-Nicolet National Forest

Scenes on Highway 70 in the Eagle River/Florence District are sure to please passengers on a drive through the Forest. Bright reds pop up through the pines and warm yellows make a sunny day even better. Heritage Drive, a National Scenic Byway, offers up a wide range of fall colors all the way into Phelps, WI. Pockets of vibrant colors have been spotted on US Hwy 2 near the Northern Great Lakes Visitor Center. Most routes on the Chequamegon-Nicolet National Forest will be sure to please but the best is yet to come! For more details on the Wisconsin Fall Color Report, visit: www.travelwisconsin.com/fall-color-report.

As always when visiting your national forests, safety first and know before you go!

 


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