Posted by: Sandy Steinman | July 28, 2020

Virtual Visits to Marine Sanctuaries

Get Into Your Sanctuary!
Looking for fun this summer? Join us July 31 through August 2 for a virtual Get Into Your Sanctuary weekend!

We are excited to announce that this year Get Into Your Sanctuary weekend is going virtual! Join us from July 31 to August 2 for a unique opportunity to experience all of NOAA’s National Marine Sanctuary System from wherever you are. From taking an ocean safari to virtually diving through shipwrecks to learning how to cook sustainably from a professional chef, there will be something for everyone to enjoy!

Tune into our LIVE Get Into Your Sanctuary programming July 31 to August 2 by visiting our Facebook page!

Friday, July 31, 2020 4:00 PM PST
Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary: Explore & Discover Sunken Legacies

Sunday, August 2, 2020 1:00 PM PST
Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary: A Revival of Maritime Culture 

Click read more to see details of programs

Friday, July 31, 2020 4:00 PM PST

Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary: Explore & Discover Sunken Legacies

Hear stories of the oldest shipwrecks recorded in Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary: the passenger vessel Winfield Scott which collided with Anacapa Island, and the passenger-cargo steamer Cuba which struck rocks off San Miguel Island. Dive in and explore what happened when these vessels started taking on water… More than150 historic ships and aircraft have been reported lost within the waters of the sanctuary, although just 25 have been discovered to date. SCUBA divers can enjoy viewing some of the protected wrecks within the sanctuary – check with local dive vessels for available trips and remember to please look but don’t touch. While visiting Santa Barbara you can also learn more about sanctuary shipwrecks,and other fascinating sea stories, by visiting the Santa Barbara Maritime Museum. 

 

Sunday, August 2, 2020 1:00 PM PST

Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary: A Revival of Maritime Culture 

Discover the Chumash Community’s Tomol Crossing with Eva Pagaling, a member of the Santa Ynez Band of Samala Chumash Indians. This journey across the Santa Barbara Channel to Santa Cruz Island is done in a tomol, a redwood planked canoe held together by tar and pine pitch, used for both cultural and commercial purposes The Chumash people originate directly from this region in deep time back to when the large island of Santa Rosae was divided by sea level rise into the four northern Channel Islands of today. Chumash maritime culture has been and continues to be intimately shaped by that connection. For Chumash people, the Channel Islands and the surrounding national marine sanctuary hold a value that is beyond measure. The sanctuary invites you to become stewards for the protection of natural and cultural resources so that nature can thrive and cultural connections remain strong.


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